Category Archives: Photography Shows

Slideluck Potshow London: Two highlights – Japan, I wish I knew your name by Pierfrancesco Celada and Mute: The Silence of Dogs by Martin Usborne

Slideluck Potshow London, organized by Mariateresa Salvati and invited to Brighton by the Miniclicks Photo Talks crew, held its first event in Brighton on Sunday to screen a selection of photos from past editions. 24 works were chosen by New Statesman photo editor, Rebecca McClelland, and artistic director and curator of QUAD and coFounder and director of FORMAT Festival, Louise Clements. As with Pecha Kucha, there is a particular formula for the events which take place in cities around the world. The event is free and is organised on a voluntary basis.

What is Slideshow Potluck?
“It is a NYC-based arts non-profit, operating in many cities globally, that aims to bring people together around food and art, and to give people an interesting, engaging, and fun platform for sharing art with their community.” From the website.

PIERFRANCESCO CELADA – JAPAN, I WISH I KNEW YOUR NAME

Japan, I wish I knew your name from pierfrancesco celada on Vimeo.

Pierfrancesco Celada is one to watch and his multimedia piece, Japan, I wish I knew your name, with its artful interplay of still photography, moving image and sound, was, for me, one of the highlights of the Slideshow. Why? Because the whole concept works really well as a multimedia work; it is well-conceived, wonderfully executed and is elevated by its aesthetic considerations, sequencing, use of camera shots and the ambient soundscapes. I was utterly transported for all 3mins 51 secs.

The work was produced at Magnum in Motion, New York, courtesy of Ideastap Photographic Award and received an Honourable Mention, Lensculture International Exposure Awards, 2011.

Celada writes: “During a brief visit to Japan in 2009 I was soon fascinated by the isolation and loneliness I was feeling in the streets. It started as a personal journey, a foreigner traveling in an alien environment. Language and cultural differences were only augmenting this distance between the locals and me. However, while observing people, it was clear that even indigenous were not able to interact successfully. I have then decided to come back in 2010 and better visualize these concepts.

“The Tokyo-Nagoya-Osaka Megalopolis, also called Taiheiyō Belt is a unique example of urban agglomeration with an estimated population of over 80 million people. Despite this incredibly high number of chances to interact, it seems that society is moving in the opposite direction. The purpose of this investigation is to create awareness and highlight the problems that modernization and the rapid changes in the environment create in our lives. Is it still important to be, or feel, part of a group? Do we feel part of the environment? Are we alone in the crowd?” From the website.

MARTIN USBORNE – MUTE – THE SILENCE OF DOGS IN CARS


© Martin Osborne, The Silence of Dogs in Cars, 2012
I love Martin’s body of work, The Silence of Dogs in Cars, which was featured in Hotshoe magazine. So it was fantastic to see the collection of images as a slideshow and the immersion in the backroom of the Green Door in Brighton seemed to echo that of the dogs in the cars, especially as photographers were dotted round the room taking photos as we watched the show. (Note to organizers: I find that it disturbs my concentration when I’m watching a slideshow or film and I know that people are taking photos. What about after the show, rather than during?)

I really feel for these dogs and Martin does too. In fact, he cares so much that he’s set up A year to help blog where you can follow his progress as he attempts “to save all animals everywhere” in a year. I should put him in touch with my mum, who wants some of her ashes scattered in the Coliseum or Torre Argentina where the Gatti di Roma (Cats of Rome) have special status.

I love the text on his website too: “Martin lives in East London where he has his photographic studio. He is interested in the ever-curious and often disturbing relationship between humans and other animals.” However, if he reads this, there is the letter n missing from the first ‘and’ in the text on his site, I’ve added it here. Call me pedantic, but I’d rather mention it so that it can be rectified, than ignore it.

If you’re going to Paris Photo, Martin will be doing a book signing of Mute – The Silence of Dogs in Cars tomorrow at 4pm at the Kehrer Publishing stand, EE3. And if you miss this, you can catch the show in London next year from 19 March  – 27 April 2013 when it will be exhibited at The Little Black Gallery.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photographers blogs, Photography Shows, short films Tagged: brighton, HotShoe, Japan I wish I knew your name, Kehrer Publishing, Louise Clements, Mariateresa Salvati, Paris Photo, Pierfrancesco Celada, Rebecca McClelland, Slideluck Potshow Brighton, The Little Black Gallery, The Silence of Dogs

Brighton Photo Fringe 2012 – Mark Chilvers solo show The Elephant until 28 October

Another quick post to point you to a solo show of work by London-based photojournalist Mark Chilvers. Aptly titled The Elephant – referring to Elephant and Castle, not the wild animal – Chilvers’ project centres on the residents and the housing estate in south east London.

©Mark Chilvers, Boy with the Orange Net, from the series The Elephant.
Showing at The Phoenix Gallery, Brighton until 28 October.

Chilvers adds: “The Heygate estate was completed in 1974 but has been already condemned before reaching its 40th birthday. The residents have been ‘decanted’ and new dreams have been promised to the future communities of what is now called The Elephant or South Central.” There’s even a blog Live from The Heygate set up by a former resident, but it has not been updated since 2011.

Filed under: Photography Shows Tagged: Mark Chilvers, south London, The Elephant

Open Vote – The European Bank of Reconstruction and Development puts staff photo competition images to online vote

JUDGE FOR YOURSELF
If you fancy yourself as a judge and want to make a vote, follow the link to 50 photographs submitted to an annual competition arranged for staff working for the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development.

This is the fourth year of the internal competition and I had the pleasure to help judge the winners with photographer, author and publisher Anthony Osmond-Evans who recently published Spirit of London a coffee-table book documenting “the changing seasons, personalities and cultures” making up today’s London. The standard of entries was high and both Anthony and I found it difficult at times to choose between images.

Over 800 single images were submitted in five categories to the competition. To cast your vote, follow the link to the Facebook EBRD Peoples’ Choice page. “Photos taken by our staff capture people, landscapes and events from our region and beyond. ‘Like’ the images that impress you the most and help us select the very best of 2012″ from 50 photos.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Awards & Competitions, Photography Books, Photography Shows Tagged: Anthony Osmond-Evans, European Bank of Reconstruction and Development, Miranda Gavin, photo competition, Spirit of London, staff photo competition

Photo Stroll – Press preview Tom Wood Men & Women and Shoot! Existential Photography open at The Photographers’ Gallery London

Today, a whirlwind Photo Stroll tour through the press preview today of two photo shows, Tom Wood’s photo show Men & Women, and the shoot-themed collection of photos Shoot! Existential Photography. Both exhibitions open tomorrow at The Photographers’ Gallery in London and run until 6 January. So there’s plenty of time to take a stroll.

These shows combine a diverse range of visual genres and the tenderness of Wood’s beautifully articulated moments offsets the drama of the shoot imagery, such as Christian Marclay’s Crossfire and the various images of gun-toting women, including Fire at Will documenting Niki de Saint Phalle’s ‘shooting paintings’ created in the early 1960s. For those who fancy themselves as the fastest draw in the West (End), there’s even a shooting alley where, if you hit the bulls eye or the surrounding ring (see my attempt, last photo), the camera is triggered and Bingo, you get a photo of you shooting. For more on Men & Women, see earlier post on Tom Wood.
All iPhone photos © Miranda Gavin, 2012.

Click to view slideshow.

Click link to view the gallery images from the slide show…

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Filed under: Photo Stroll, Photographers, Photography Books, Photography Shows Tagged: Christian Marclay, Crossfire, Erik Kessels, Fire at Will, london, Men & Women, Niki de Saint Phalle, Shoot! Existential Photography, The Photographers’ Gallery, Tom Wood

Brighton Photo Fringe 2012 – Blind Field presents Origins of Encounter until 21 October

Blind Field are showing Origins of Encounter at the Phoenix Brighton until Sunday 21 October as part of the Brighton Fringe 2012. The artists involved are Joan Alexander, Luke AR Hamblin and Louise Maher, all of whom, according to the press release, “examine notions of the encounter in relation to place, narrative and the photograph”.

© Joan Alexander – Study V – Facing North Window – 60 Minutes

Joan Alexander
“Alexander’s work explores the margins of inscription and projection, the unacknowledged spectra between positive and negative. Alexander is interested in the ‘latent image’. A visual in waiting, from between times, like the line between shadow and light; the line, like a map, is always a metaphor. Alexander’s practice immerses the viewer within a passage of time through an encounter with the movement and interruption of light. Her projections create a space where the viewer must pass through lines of light drawing attention to their presence. The correlation between printed and projected material asks for a closer examination creating awareness to the tangible and intangible nature of her practice.”

© Luke AR Hamblin – A study of still life. Sunflowers

Luke AR Hamblin
“Hamblin is interested in the way in which photography enables us to dissect the world and pull it apart. For Hamblin making photographic pictures is about assembling a Cast of characters, analysing their poses, placing them in the picture frame. Hamblin has developed a complex process of picture-making, exploring the role of perception and portrayal in our engagement with ‘place’. His series Studies for a theory of the Epic Photograph encourages us to think about how simple aspects of pose and gesture can embody whole narrative worlds. Drawing on references from early twentieth century modes of portrayal: theatre, cinema and painting, Hamblin’s photographs offer the viewer undisclosed narratives to decipher and re-construct.”

© Louise Maher – Old Head, Kinsale 2006-2012

Louise Maher
“Maher’s practice concentrates upon the inextricable relationship we have to our environment. By focusing on everyday expressions of this connection, she explores perceptions of the encounter. Maher’s approach stems from an appreciation of the historical development of street photography, yet it is also influenced by a typological approach. She values the photograph’s capacity to simultaneously document and picture the world. Her photographic series’ unite aspects of spontaneity and formalization to create a visual language that presents the viewer with space to translate.” From the press release.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Festivals, Photography Shows Tagged: Blind Field, brighton, Brighton Photo Fringe, Joan Alexander, Louise Maher, Luke AR Hamblin, Origins of Encounter, photo show

Photo Show – First major UK exhibition of work by Tom Wood to open at The Photographers’ Gallery London

© Tom Wood, Seacombe Ferry 1985, photo courtesy the artist and The Photographers’ Gallery.

© Tom Wood, Ladies Toilet Attendant 1985, photo courtesy the artist and The Photographers’ Gallery.

The first major UK show of Irish-born photographer Tom Wood Men and Women opens at The Photographers’ Gallery on 12 October and runs until 6 January. Wood continuously recorded the everyday lives of the people of Liverpool and the Merseyside area from 1973 until the early 2000s, working in both black and white and later in colour. The exhibition will showcase over sixty previously unpublished portraits as well as a selection of vintage prints and book dummies of his now out-of-print publications Looking for Love (1989), All Zones off Peak (1998) and Photieman (2005).

“Editing from long-term and previously unseen bodies of work, such as the Football Grounds, Shipyard and Docks and Women’s Market, Tom Wood has re-evaluated these images through a creative collaboration with artist Padraig Timoney. Grouping the images in a non-chronological order under the headings Men and Women, the exhibition will showcase a curated selection of these photographs,soon to be published as two separate books by Steidl. The installation of the photographs will reflect the sequencing of the books mixing the different formats, styles and processes. This arrangement will highlight the formal correspondences and relationships between pictures as well as Wood’s prolonged involvement with his subject matter.

“His photographs include both candid and posed portraits of people alone or in groups. Images of strangers are interspersed with those of friends and family and are often made from repeated engagements with particular locales.

© Tom Wood, Maryhill 1974, photo courtesy the artist and The Photographers’ Gallery.

“Trust and empathy are both key elements in Wood’s practice and his photographs are the result of considered observation, offering affirmative responses to moments from the lives of those he pictures.” From the press release.

© Tom Wood, Old Man on bench, Graffiti tiles 1985, photo courtesy the artist and The Photographers’ Gallery.

Men and Women is a collaboration with the National Media Museum, Bradford. It is curated by Stefanie Braun, Senior Curator, The Photographers’ Gallery and Greg Hobson, Curator of Photographs at the National Media Museum.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photography Shows, Portraiture Tagged: documentary photography, Liverpool, london, Men and Women, Merseyside, Padraig Timoney, The Photographers’ Gallery, Tom Wood

Photo Show – Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 images of deep space and beyond on show at the Royal Observatory London

People and Space winner: Venus-Jupiter Close Conjunction by Laurent Laveder (France)

What the photographer says: ‘In this image Venus is higher and on the right of Jupiter. I take my place in the lower right corner of the frame to complete the diagonal formed by me, the two planets, the Pleiades and Taurus. With my red flashlight on my head, I illuminate the beach. At low tide, the sand is wet and is reflecting the blockhaus.’ Taken with Canon 5D Mark II camera; Sigma 50mm f/1.4 lens at f/2.0; ISO 3200; 8-second exposure

How could anyone resist posting on the winning images in Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 competition? Not only are the images beautiful, in the deep sense of the word, but they are also a reminder, at least for me, of our place in an infinite universe. I have seen photos that depict scenes that seem to recall the sheer magnificence of the skies at night but nothing, nothing, comes close to the reality. These images are, for me, sublime in the true sense of the word.

Overall and Deep Space winner: M51 The Whirlpool Galaxy by Martin Pugh (UK/Australia)

What the photographer says: ‘I was always going to be excited about this image given the exceptional seeing conditions M51 was photographed under and the addition of several hours of Ha data has really boosted the HII regions.’ Taken with Planewave 17-inch CDK telescope; Software Bisque Paramount ME mount; Apogee U16M camera.

Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012. Pleiades Cluster by Jacob von Chorus (Canada), aged 15

What the photographer says: ‘This image was a test to see what would happen with such a long exposure. It was taken near dusk, with only two frames and an hour of exposure. This image has since become one of my best.’ Taken with Sky Watcher Equinox 80ED telescope; Celestron CG-5 mount; f/6.25 lens; Stock Canon 100D camera; ISO 800; 30-minute exposure

So, on a sunny Sunday morning as I’m sitting in a kitchen in Prague, I want to share these other worldly delights. The competition is now in in its fourth year and there were over 800 entries from astronomers and astrophotographers from around the world as well as from young astronomers.

“As a centre for science education and communication, the team at the Royal Observatory are keen to encourage an interest in astronomy at a young age to embed a life-long interest in the subject.” With the help of Sky at Night Magazine and the photo-sharing website Flickr, entries were submitted in the categories of ‘Earth and Space’, ‘Our Solar System’, ‘Deep Space’ and ‘Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year’ as well as ‘Best Newcomer’ and ‘People and Space’ and ‘Robotic Scope’.

The winning images are on show at a free photo exhibition at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, London, open daily from 10.00-17.00.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Shows Tagged: astronomy, Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012, Greenwich, Jacob von Chorus, Laurent Laveder, london, Martin Pugh, Royal Observatory

Photo Show – Helen Sears Sightlines and Pastoral Monuments on show at Klompching Gallery New York

© Helen Sear, Sightlines, Untitled 4, 2011. Archival Pigment Print with Acrylic Gesso 7.25” x 7.25”, Edition of 3. From $2,000

© Helen Sear, Pastoral Monument 11, Fumaria Bastardi, 2012, Archival Pigment Print, 27.5” x 27.5”, Edition of 3 + 2 AP’s (AP1 nfs). From $3,000.

 SIGHTLINES AND PASTORAL MOMENTS
The third solo exhibition of new artworks by the British photographer Helen Sear is on until 26 October at the Klompching Gallery in New York. Two new series will be presented as the gallery’s opening exhibition for the 2012–2013 season, accompanied by the US launch of the monograph charting a more than 25-year practice.

“Sightlines and Pastoral Monuments continue Sear’s commitment to conceptual applications, integration of photographic process, historical reference and visual allure. Sightlines is an exquisite set of 21 photographs, partially concerned with ideas about the unique object and the copy. The images themselves depict a portrait of a woman whose face is obscured by a mass-produced, but hand-painted figurine of a bird. Sear alters the final photograph through the application of several layers of white primer—gesso.

“The images, then, are also about photographing paint and painting photographs. This convergence of the unique and/or the copy is further implicated by notions of her concern with identity.obscuring the face of the woman, Sear interrupts the gaze of both sitter and observer. The spectator of the photograph is unable to know the sitter’s identity, in a similar way that she/he can’t know the identity of the person(s) who hand-painted the bird. These small-scale photographs confound our expectations in the most delightful way, and are a testimony to the conceptual and visual strength of Sear’s practice.

“Showing alongside Sightlines, is Pastoral Monuments, which expands an underlying theme of the real and the re-presentation of it. In this case, Sear references the historical photographs of the botanist and photographer, Mary Dillwyn, whose photographs from the early 1850’s depicted wild flowers arranged in domestic crockery. Sear has sourced more than 80 wild flowers from the same Welsh field and photographed them in jugs and vases from around the world.

“Through handling the resulting prints and rephotographing them—evidencing this handling—Sear believes that “the flowers and their containers become connected in a material sense, across the surface of the image.” Further, we see in the photographs familiar ideas associated with flowers—youth, beauty and mortality. In some ways, these photographs become monuments to flowers.” Press release.

Filed under: Art shows, Photography Shows, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Helen Sears, New York, Pastoral Monuments, Sightlines