Author Archives: thea

One of our artists to teach a class at the Santa Fe Photo Workshops!

“Finding your voice as a photographer.” – taught by Michael Crouser.


Michael was an ideal teacher: generous, kind, extremely well versed in photography, and incredibly creative. Alesandra Zsiba, former workshop participant

Finding your photographic voice can be a lifelong quest. With Michael Crouser as your guide, begin the journey to developing and honing your own personal aestheticthe point of view that is uniquely your own. We start by examining the works of well-known photographers and review the choices they make in producing their images, and how they present a unique and personal voice as a photographer. We examine the choices that we make when producing a photograph, the choices that separate the image from a mere snapshot and make it a photograph we can call our own. need an attorney . These elements include composition, lighting, subject, perspective, black and white versus color, and a myriad of other choices.
Our stimulating and thought provoking classroom sessions are followed with field sessions every day, to put into practice our insights, develop our eye and our voice, and to draw inspiration from the beauty of Santa Fe.
We begin to see photographs differently and learn to identify the aspects of our work that are uniquely ours, as well as the aspects that we need to discard. Its not just the techniques that make the difference. Most importantly, its the point of viewyours. Ultimately, we lay a foundation to build upon and develop, which becomes the voice that is uniquely you.


More info on the class here: http://www.santafeworkshops.com/photography-workshops/workshop/804

One of our artists to teach a class at the Santa Fe Photo Workshops!

“Finding your voice as a photographer.” – taught by Michael Crouser.


Michael was an ideal teacher: generous, kind, extremely well versed in photography, and incredibly creative. recycled glass products . Alesandra Zsiba, former workshop participant

Finding your photographic voice can be a lifelong quest. With Michael Crouser as your guide, begin the journey to developing and honing your own personal aestheticthe point of view that is uniquely your own. We start by examining the works of well-known photographers and review the choices they make in producing their images, and how they present a unique and personal voice as a photographer. We examine the choices that we make when producing a photograph, the choices that separate the image from a mere snapshot and make it a photograph we can call our own. These elements include composition, lighting, subject, perspective, black and white versus color, and a myriad of other choices.
Our stimulating and thought provoking classroom sessions are followed with field sessions every day, to put into practice our insights, develop our eye and our voice, and to draw inspiration from the beauty of Santa Fe.
We begin to see photographs differently and learn to identify the aspects of our work that are uniquely ours, as well as the aspects that we need to discard. Its not just the techniques that make the difference. Most importantly, its the point of viewyours. Ultimately, we lay a foundation to build upon and develop, which becomes the voice that is uniquely you.


More info on the class here: http://www.santafeworkshops.com/photography-workshops/workshop/804

ARCHER, RYUJIE, SACABO Press Release

VERVE Gallery of Photography Presents

LAURIE ARCHER

RYUIJIE

JOSÉPHINE SACABO



Opening Reception: Friday, September 16, 2011, 5-7pm

Exhibition is on view Friday, September 9 – through Saturday, October 29, 2011

Conversations with the artists: Saturday, September 17, 2011, 2pm

Location: VERVE Gallery of Photography

VERVE Gallery of Photography is pleased to present an exhibition of three gallery artists working in visual poetic interpretations in three different black and white photographic mediums. Santa Fean, Laurie Archer, will present her new solar plate etchings combined with the sewing of thread into the paper inspired by a William Stafford poem, The Way It Is. Ryuijie, from Monterey, California, will present Poems in Platinum and Silver, contemplative and serene platinum palladium and gelatin silver prints. New Orleans artist, Joséphine Sacabo, will be exhibiting photogravures from Óyeme con los Ojos, a new series inspired by the life and work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, a 17th century Mexican nun, who was one of the greatest poets and intellectuals of the American continent.

The public reception for this exhibition takes place on Friday, September 16, 2011 from 5-7pm. There will be a conversation with all three artists at VERVE Gallery on Saturday, September 17 beginning at 2pm.



The exhibition is on view from Friday, September 9, 2011 through Saturday, October 29, 2011.



LAURIE ARCHER



In Ms. Archer’s second VERVE gallery exhibition she debuts her latest body of work entitled, There’s a thread you follow…, the opening line from William Stafford’s poem, “The Way It Is.” In this new work she makes use of the solar plate etching process and combines the meticulous and careful placement of thread into the paper. The series is then divided into three sub-sections, giving the images their individual titles; AT THE RIVER; ON THE ROAD; and, IN THE WOOD.

The “thread” metaphorically and physically follows the line where water meets a bank, a weed, a rock – either at the river, on the road, or in wood. Archer explains, “It follows the line of the road I walk every morning, where I pick up detritus that transformed and became an etching…the pieces of wood in my house that have the most exquisite calligraphy under the bark, thanks to beetle larva.”

There’s a thread you follow. It goes among

things that change. But it doesn’t change.

People wonder about what you are pursuing.

You have to explain about the thread.

But it is hard for others to see.

While you hold it you can’t get lost.

Tragedies happen; people get hurt

or die; and you suffer and get old.

Nothing you do can stop time’s unfolding.

You don’t ever let go of the thread.

– William Stafford

Does the poet suggest that the thread can be time – the one thread that follows everyone, everywhere – no matter what may change? For the artist, it is the thread that connects all of her artistic work such as how she learned to sew on an old-fashioned treadle sewing machine, and has been sewing ever since. The treadle sewing machine led to weaving on a four-harness loom for eighteen years. That led to using the resulting weavings over a wooden frame to make freestanding sculptures.

Now, Archer is aware that the thread throughout her life has been the arts. She has been an artist in one form or another since childhood working in the performing arts, book arts, and the visual arts, including the past few years working with solar plate etchings. She was graduated in 1959 with a BFA in Fine Arts from the Colorado College. She is the recipient of two major awards including the Fulbright for Dance & Art in Peru (1958) and the John Hay Whitney Fellowship in NYC to continue her studies in Theater, Acting and Dancing (1959). She was in the original cast of Camelot on Broadway in 1960. In addition, Archer has shown her visual work in New Mexico including the Palace of the Governors, Stables Gallery in Taos as well as exhibiting at the Gran Palais in Paris, the El Paso Fine Arts Museum in Texas, and the Taller Boricua Gallery in New York City.

RYUIJIE



Poems in Platinum and Silver, are serene poetic moments in time, images from two bodies of work – Ice Forms in gelatin silver and P2 in platinum palladium. Ice Forms are photographs of botanicals specimens frozen in blocks of ice. The ice acts as a filter for viewing these abstract yet familiar and sensual flower forms. In recent years the artist’s approach for the Ice Forms has been to photograph them in the Spring and then spend the rest of the year printing in the darkroom.

“Like most of my photography projects this one started with the thought: “what would happen if”… I couldn’t have predicted that the ice would become as important as the flower it encased. Each block was filled with bubbles and fractures, and the glow of light through the frozen water was magic. Discovering the always new combinations of textured ice, translucent petals and twisting stems continues to be one of my favorite preoccupations.”

P2 was titled for the square format of the artist’s platinum prints. This series includes landscapes, nudes, and abstract forms with the common theme—– the quiet and contemplative moment. The resulting photographs are small square 5×5” prints that allows the viewer to get up close and see every detail that the photographer intended.

While the subject matter remains the same as in the artist’s earlier work, the process itself is a hybridized approach to traditional photography.

“These photographs have echoes of my earliest work. Those first images taken in the mid 1970’s with a 4×5 camera; they depicted landscapes, plants, nudes and abstractions, and were printed in the best traditions of classic black and white photography [through gelatin silver prints]. The P2 photographs begin as 2 ¼ film negatives, but from there, everything changes. The film is scanned, adjustments are made in Photoshop, a digital negative is made and then it is printed in the darkroom as a platinum palladium print.”

Ryuijie was born in Otaru Japan in 1950. He moved with his family to the US as a young child. Over the years, Ryuijie has lived in many places. It was in Monterey that an exhibit of Jerry Uelsmann’s Photographs inspired him and propelled him to do fine art black and white photography. Ryuijie has pursued his photographic vision for twenty-eight years, and during that time has acquired a reputation for exquisite platinum-palladium prints. His work has appeared in View Camera, Photovision, Camera and Darkroom, Black & White and Lenswork. He has published three books, Ryuijie: Photographs, Time and Place, and Fragments of Time. Works by Ryuijie can be found in collections worldwide.

JOSÉPHINE SACABO



Joséphine Sacabo will be exhibiting new work entitled, Óyeme con los Ojos [Hear Me With Your Eyes], inspired by the life and work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, a 17th century Mexican nun who was one of the greatest poets and intellectuals of the American continent. Sor Juana lived in Mexico City in the late 1600’s and was very active in defending women’s rights in Mexico through her writing and poetry which centered on freedom.



“She created the most renowned salon of her time from behind the bars of her cloistered cell. And in that cell she studied science and philosophy, wrote poems, plays and music, and championed women’s right to intellectual and spiritual freedom. In the end, after resisting valiantly for over twenty years, she was silenced by the Inquisition. It is my hope that these images will help break that silence so that we may once again “hear her with our eyes”. This work is dedicated to women everywhere who, whatever their confines, prevail. They are our hope.”



Joséphine Sacabo lives and works mostly in New Orleans, where she has been strongly influenced by the unique ambience of the city. She is a native of Laredo, Texas, and was educated at Bard College, New York. Before mobbing to New Orleans, she lived and worked extensively in France and England. Her earlier work was in the photo-journalistic tradition, influenced by Robert Frank, Josef Koudelka, and Henri Cartier-Bresson. She now works in a very subjective, introspective style. She uses poetry as the genesis of her work and lists poets as her most important influences, among them Rilke, Baudelaire, Pedro Salinas, Vincente Huiobro, and Juan Rulfo, Mallarmé, and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Sacabo, has published four books of her work including “Une Femme Habitée” in Paris in 1991 by Editions Marval; award winning “Pedro Paramo” in 2002 by the University of Texas Press; “Cante Jondo” in 2002 and “Duino Elegie” in 2005 both by 21st Publishing. Sacabo has had solo shows in Paris, London, Madrid, Toulouse, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and other major U.S. cities. Her work has also been widely published in magazines in the United States and Europe and is in numerous Museum collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art; The Museum of Modern Art – N.Y.; The Smithsonian – Washington D.C.; The Library of Congress; among many others. Joséphine Sacabo has taught at a number of highly acclaimed workshops: the Center for Photography at Woodstock, the Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie in Arles – France and at the Santa Fe Workshops.



HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

(low resolution images viewable in attached pdf)



CONTACT INFORMATION FOR LAURIE ARCHER

Email: archerlaurie@gmail.com

Phone: 505-982-0894

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR RYUIJIE

Email: ryuijie@sbcglobal.net

Phone: 831-277-0045



CONTACT INFORMATION FOR JOSÉPHINE SACABO

Email: josephinesacabo@gmail.com

Phone: 504-352-9101



CONTACT INFORMATION FOR VERVE GALLERY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Jennifer Schlesinger, Director

219 E. Marcy Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501

Email: jennifer@vervegallery.com

Phone: 505-982-5009 Fax: 505-982-9111



See images and exhibition info on our Website here.



ARCHER, RYUJIE, SACABO Press Release

VERVE Gallery of Photography Presents

LAURIE ARCHER

RYUIJIE

JOSÉPHINE SACABO



Opening Reception: Friday, September 16, 2011, 5-7pm

Exhibition is on view Friday, September 9 – through Saturday, October 29, 2011

Conversations with the artists: Saturday, September 17, 2011, 2pm

Location: VERVE Gallery of Photography

VERVE Gallery of Photography is pleased to present an exhibition of three gallery artists working in visual poetic interpretations in three different black and white photographic mediums. Santa Fean, Laurie Archer, will present her new solar plate etchings combined with the sewing of thread into the paper inspired by a William Stafford poem, The Way It Is. Ryuijie, from Monterey, California, will present Poems in Platinum and Silver, contemplative and serene platinum palladium and gelatin silver prints. New Orleans artist, Joséphine Sacabo, will be exhibiting photogravures from Óyeme con los Ojos, a new series inspired by the life and work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, a 17th century Mexican nun, who was one of the greatest poets and intellectuals of the American continent.

The public reception for this exhibition takes place on Friday, September 16, 2011 from 5-7pm. There will be a conversation with all three artists at VERVE Gallery on Saturday, September 17 beginning at 2pm.



The exhibition is on view from Friday, September 9, 2011 through Saturday, October 29, 2011.



LAURIE ARCHER



In Ms. Archer’s second VERVE gallery exhibition she debuts her latest body of work entitled, There’s a thread you follow…, the opening line from William Stafford’s poem, “The Way It Is.” In this new work she makes use of the solar plate etching process and combines the meticulous and careful placement of thread into the paper. The series is then divided into three sub-sections, giving the images their individual titles; AT THE RIVER; ON THE ROAD; and, IN THE WOOD.

The “thread” metaphorically and physically follows the line where water meets a bank, a weed, a rock – either at the river, on the road, or in wood. Archer explains, “It follows the line of the road I walk every morning, where I pick up detritus that transformed and became an etching…the pieces of wood in my house that have the most exquisite calligraphy under the bark, thanks to beetle larva.”

There’s a thread you follow. It goes among

things that change. But it doesn’t change.

People wonder about what you are pursuing.

You have to explain about the thread.

But it is hard for others to see.

While you hold it you can’t get lost.

Tragedies happen; people get hurt

or die; and you suffer and get old.

Nothing you do can stop time’s unfolding.

You don’t ever let go of the thread.

– William Stafford

Does the poet suggest that the thread can be time – the one thread that follows everyone, everywhere – no matter what may change? For the artist, it is the thread that connects all of her artistic work such as how she learned to sew on an old-fashioned treadle sewing machine, and has been sewing ever since. The treadle sewing machine led to weaving on a four-harness loom for eighteen years. That led to using the resulting weavings over a wooden frame to make freestanding sculptures.

Now, Archer is aware that the thread throughout her life has been the arts. She has been an artist in one form or another since childhood working in the performing arts, book arts, and the visual arts, including the past few years working with solar plate etchings. She was graduated in 1959 with a BFA in Fine Arts from the Colorado College. She is the recipient of two major awards including the Fulbright for Dance & Art in Peru (1958) and the John Hay Whitney Fellowship in NYC to continue her studies in Theater, Acting and Dancing (1959). She was in the original cast of Camelot on Broadway in 1960. In addition, Archer has shown her visual work in New Mexico including the Palace of the Governors, Stables Gallery in Taos as well as exhibiting at the Gran Palais in Paris, the El Paso Fine Arts Museum in Texas, and the Taller Boricua Gallery in New York City.

RYUIJIE



Poems in Platinum and Silver, are serene poetic moments in time, images from two bodies of work – Ice Forms in gelatin silver and P2 in platinum palladium. Ice Forms are photographs of botanicals specimens frozen in blocks of ice. The ice acts as a filter for viewing these abstract yet familiar and sensual flower forms. In recent years the artist’s approach for the Ice Forms has been to photograph them in the Spring and then spend the rest of the year printing in the darkroom.

“Like most of my photography projects this one started with the thought: “what would happen if”… I couldn’t have predicted that the ice would become as important as the flower it encased. Each block was filled with bubbles and fractures, and the glow of light through the frozen water was magic. Discovering the always new combinations of textured ice, translucent petals and twisting stems continues to be one of my favorite preoccupations.”

P2 was titled for the square format of the artist’s platinum prints. This series includes landscapes, nudes, and abstract forms with the common theme—– the quiet and contemplative moment. The resulting photographs are small square 5×5” prints that allows the viewer to get up close and see every detail that the photographer intended.

While the subject matter remains the same as in the artist’s earlier work, the process itself is a hybridized approach to traditional photography.

“These photographs have echoes of my earliest work. Those first images taken in the mid 1970’s with a 4×5 camera; they depicted landscapes, plants, nudes and abstractions, and were printed in the best traditions of classic black and white photography [through gelatin silver prints]. The P2 photographs begin as 2 ¼ film negatives, but from there, everything changes. The film is scanned, adjustments are made in Photoshop, a digital negative is made and then it is printed in the darkroom as a platinum palladium print.”

Ryuijie was born in Otaru Japan in 1950. He moved with his family to the US as a young child. Over the years, Ryuijie has lived in many places. It was in Monterey that an exhibit of Jerry Uelsmann’s Photographs inspired him and propelled him to do fine art black and white photography. Ryuijie has pursued his photographic vision for twenty-eight years, and during that time has acquired a reputation for exquisite platinum-palladium prints. His work has appeared in View Camera, Photovision, Camera and Darkroom, Black & White and Lenswork. He has published three books, Ryuijie: Photographs, Time and Place, and Fragments of Time. Works by Ryuijie can be found in collections worldwide.

JOSÉPHINE SACABO



Joséphine Sacabo will be exhibiting new work entitled, Óyeme con los Ojos [Hear Me With Your Eyes], inspired by the life and work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, a 17th century Mexican nun who was one of the greatest poets and intellectuals of the American continent. Sor Juana lived in Mexico City in the late 1600’s and was very active in defending women’s rights in Mexico through her writing and poetry which centered on freedom.



“She created the most renowned salon of her time from behind the bars of her cloistered cell. And in that cell she studied science and philosophy, wrote poems, plays and music, and championed women’s right to intellectual and spiritual freedom. In the end, after resisting valiantly for over twenty years, she was silenced by the Inquisition. It is my hope that these images will help break that silence so that we may once again “hear her with our eyes”. This work is dedicated to women everywhere who, whatever their confines, prevail. They are our hope.”



Joséphine Sacabo lives and works mostly in New Orleans, where she has been strongly influenced by the unique ambience of the city. She is a native of Laredo, Texas, and was educated at Bard College, New York. Before mobbing to New Orleans, she lived and worked extensively in France and England. Her earlier work was in the photo-journalistic tradition, influenced by Robert Frank, Josef Koudelka, and Henri Cartier-Bresson. She now works in a very subjective, introspective style. She uses poetry as the genesis of her work and lists poets as her most important influences, among them Rilke, Baudelaire, Pedro Salinas, Vincente Huiobro, and Juan Rulfo, Mallarmé, and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Sacabo, has published four books of her work including “Une Femme Habitée” in Paris in 1991 by Editions Marval; award winning “Pedro Paramo” in 2002 by the University of Texas Press; “Cante Jondo” in 2002 and “Duino Elegie” in 2005 both by 21st Publishing. Sacabo has had solo shows in Paris, London, Madrid, Toulouse, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and other major U.S. cities. Her work has also been widely published in magazines in the United States and Europe and is in numerous Museum collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art; The Museum of Modern Art – N.Y.; The Smithsonian – Washington D.C.; The Library of Congress; among many others. Joséphine Sacabo has taught at a number of highly acclaimed workshops: the Center for Photography at Woodstock, the Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie in Arles – France and at the Santa Fe Workshops.



HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

(low resolution images viewable in attached pdf)



CONTACT INFORMATION FOR LAURIE ARCHER

Email: archerlaurie@gmail.com

Phone: 505-982-0894

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR RYUIJIE

Email: ryuijie@sbcglobal.net

Phone: 831-277-0045



CONTACT INFORMATION FOR JOSÉPHINE SACABO

Email: josephinesacabo@gmail.com

Phone: 504-352-9101



CONTACT INFORMATION FOR VERVE GALLERY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Jennifer Schlesinger, Director

219 E. Marcy Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501

Email: jennifer@vervegallery.com

Phone: 505-982-5009 Fax: 505-982-9111



See images and exhibition info on our Website here.



VERVE Gallery of Photography :: photoblog 2011-06-06 18:00:00

VERVE Gallery of Photography Presents

Cy DeCosse
A Retrospective

Opening Reception: Friday, July 8, 5-7pm
Exhibition is on view Friday, June 24 – Saturday, September 3, 2011

Conversation with Cy DeCosse: Saturday, July 9, 2pm
Location: VERVE Gallery of Photography

VERVE Gallery of Photography is pleased to present a retrospective exhibition by gallery artist and acclaimed photographer, Cy DeCosse. The exhibition showcases Cy’s work for the past eighteen years. DeCosse works in alternative processes: platinum palladium, photogravure, and gum dichromate printing. His work will grace the entire gallery for the duration of the summer.

The public reception for this exhibition is on Friday, July 8, 2011 from 5-7pm. There will be a conversation with Cy DeCosse about his work at VERVE Gallery on Saturday, July 9, 2011 from 2-3pm. The exhibition is on view Friday, June 24, 2011 through Saturday, September 3, 2011.

Cy DeCosse’s philosophy about a picture is simple: “A photograph should be interesting to look at. I like to get in close so you see things you’ve never seen before.” He does just that and he does so with extraordinary craftsmanship. His images whisk us away to lush gardens to imagine, to dream, to delight in the sublime beauty of his artistry. His work has a decidedly European flavor, a special touch he learned and explored while on a Fulbright grant in Florence. Cy’s work is unequivocally different. He is truly an alchemist in that his work is produced in alternative photographic mediums that become handcrafted platinum/palladium or three-color dichromate pigment prints. Cy discovers the extraordinary in ordinary objects by his use of light: lateral light, front light, back light, daylight, and moonlight. “Tuscan Lemons”, “Pears”, “Water Lily”, “Three Asian Onions”, “Lotus”, the “King and Queen of the Night” as seen through Cy’s inspired eye, capture what Alexander Pope calls “grace beyond the reach of art”.

DeCosse’s most recent work is a four-volume book set on the classic Greek elements: Earth, Air, Fire and Water. The photos in these books range from intimate studio photography to portraiture and landscapes in locations as distant as Iceland and the Sahara Desert.

Cy DeCosse was born in Valley City, North Dakota in 1929. He won a scholarship to the Minneapolis School of Art and Design where he bought his first camera, an Exa, and turned his coal cellar into a darkroom. After graduation, in 1954, Cy won a Fulbright Scholarship to Florence. While in Italy he studied with the gifted Renzo Maggini at the Instituto d’Arte di Porta Romana. Renzo Maggini provided Cy’s only formal photographic instruction. Cy then went on to a successful career in book publishing producing highly photographic “how-to” books on various topics many of which were translated into 17 languages.

With the sale of his company in 1994, Cy returned to his first love, photography. Cy lives and works in Minnesota. In 2001, with Keith Taylor as printer, the two began the revival of the gum dichromate technique, an alternative process that produces a color print of extraordinary beauty.

DeCosse’s work is in numerous public collections including the England Royal Trust and the Minneapolis Institute of the Arts. His work has been exhibited widely in the U.S. and abroad. There are four books containing Cy’s work. The first is a limited edition book published by The Journal of Contemporary Photography: Volume IV, entitled: Gardens of DeCosse (2000). The book is devoted exclusively to the work of the artist. The images in the book range from the quiet morning’s light falling on freshly picked vegetables to the riotous energy of flowers in full bloom. The second is a catalog for an exhibition held at the Accademia Delle Arti Del Disegno Firenze, Italy in October, 2001, entitled: Cy DeCosse: Play of the Light (2001). His third book is entitled Flowers and Food (2009) and it contains DeCosse’s botanical photographs in Gum Dichromate & Platinum. Florence by Cy DeCosse (2009) is a book of portraits that Cy dedicates to his muse, the city of Florence and its people.

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR CY DeCOSSE
Email: studio.41@mac.com
Phone: 612-721-2286

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR VERVE GALLERY OF PHOTOGRAPHY
Jennifer Schlesinger, Director
219 E. Marcy Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501
Email: director@vervegallery.com
Phone: 505-982-5009 Fax: 505-982-9111

Download the full version with images here.

Abadzic, Carrillo, Vassilev Show Press Release

For images, please check out our website and the exhibitions page.

VERVE Gallery of Photography Presents

STANKO ABADŽIC
MANUEL CARRILLO
JACKO VASSILEV

Opening Reception: Friday, April 15, 2011, 5-7pm
Exhibition is on view Friday, April 8 – through Saturday, June 16, 2011

Conversation with Jacko Vassilev
Saturday, April 16, 2011, 2pm
Location: VERVE Gallery of Photography

VERVE Gallery of Photography is pleased to present work by Eastern Europeans Stanko Abadžic and Jacko Vassilev, both of whom have worked documenting their respective cultures in stunning black and white, gelatin silver prints. Croatian born Stanko Abadžic’s second exhibition at VERVE debuts his playful new work from Berlin, Paris and Croatia. Bulgarian artist Jacko Vassilev brings to Santa Fe, for the first time, the renowned series that documented his Bulgarian culture from 1971 until 1993, when the country was under communist totalitarianism. Lastly, VERVE will be presenting newly acquired work by the only non-contemporary artist in our stable, Manuel Carrillo (1906-1989) from Mexico City.

The public reception for this exhibition takes place on Friday, April 15, 2011 from 5-7pm. There will be a conversation with Jacko Vassilev about his work at VERVE Gallery on Saturday, April 16 from 2-3pm.

The exhibition is on view from Friday, April 8, 2011 through Saturday, June 16, 2011.

STANKO ABADŽIC

Stanko Abadžic brings us new images from Berlin, Paris and Croatia. Croatian-born Abadžic is a street photographer known for irony, humor and satire in his juxtapositions. This new work continues this winning formula.

Abadžic’s work is characterized by strong contrasts of light and dark, an interest in patterns and geometric forms created by long shadows, brick or cobblestone streets, intricate ironwork designs, fences, and other grid-like elements. He seeks out children playing, people on bicycles or lingering at street cafes, and has an eye for irony. There is a strong sense of nostalgia and transience running through his work, due, no doubt, to his experiences as a displaced person.

Stanko Abadžic was born in 1952 in Vukovar, Croatia. At the age of 15 he began teaching himself photography. After marriage, he worked as a reporter and photojournalist to support his family. When the Croatian War of Independence broke out in 1991, Abadžic left everything and fled with his family to Germany for what he hoped would be a brief stay. After four difficult years, during which he took few photographs, Stanko and his family were denied German citizenship and forced to leave. He moved to Prague. Abadžic’s move brought with it a rebirth as he began a new series of photographs with a medium-format camera. With this new camera, he began to develop his visual eye in earnest.

Abadžic was able to return with his family to Croatia in 2002, settling in the capital of Zagreb. He continues to photograph in Prague and also shoots along the Adriatic. Abadžic has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art Dubrovnik, Museum of Modern Art Rijeka, Mimara Museum in Zagreb, and various galleries in Japan, Argentina Prague, Berlin, and other Eastern European cities. He is represented in the United States by John Cleary (Houston, TX), Verve Gallery (Santa Fe, NM) and Contemporary Works (Pennsylvania).

JACKO VASSILEV

Jacko Vassilev’s work gives us a compelling look at peasant life in the Bulgarian countryside during the communist regime (1971 to 1993). His images communicate to us the strength of the human spirit that endures in meager living conditions and during political oppression.

His portraits of fellow Bulgarians presents us with a full spectrum of human emotion and culture, from heartbreak to joy. Vassilev captures, with sensitivity and respect, the tumultuous history and political struggles of his people. His images of everyday people and everyday life in provincial towns throughout the rural countryside are a journey back into time.

“I really wanted to preserve all we have in Bulgaria, especially the big army of the old generation. Those people have something that the young generation does not have. Their spirit I have seen in their eyes, in their hands, and on their faces. The grand and endless expressions on their faces are so natural, so real – sometime I wish my photography could have smell and sound. At least it is something that will remain for future generations. That is why I photograph man.” – Jacko Vassilev

When Jacko was photographing this project, his darkroom was raided. He was accused by the regime of presenting the “bad” side of Bulgaria. Of this, he says, “Photography is a big art, and no one, no regimes, no party can stop the creation of it. I was keeping all my negatives and black and white art prints hidden, hoping one day my son or his children will be able to bring them out of secrecy. How blessed I am, that I have survived and I am able to show them in person. No more arrests for photographing my people, no more destroyed films and broken cameras. Today I am living in my dreams. I AM A FREE MAN. I can speak free without censoring my political vocabulary; I can travel anywhere I would like…and I am having friends from all over the world!”

Vassilev holds a Diploma from the Bulgarian Ministry of Education’s Julius Fuchik Technical School for Polygraphy & Photography. He was awarded a Diploma of Art Photography from the Ministry of Culture and the Bulgarian Photography Society in 1990. Jacko Vassilev’s photographs are included in the permanent public art collections of the International Center for Photography in New York City, and the European Center of Photography in Paris. Other prestigious museum, private and corporate collections that hold his work include: The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center in Austin, Texas; The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas; The Minneapolis Institute of Arts in Minneapolis, Minnesota; The Huntsville Museum of Art in Huntsville, Alabama; and The Bayly Art Museum in Charlottesville, Virginia. Vassilev has had numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the world including Yugoslavia, England, Germany, Brazil, Czechoslovakia, Venezuela, Italy, Bulgaria, Poland, Belgium, Hungary, Australia, Estonia, France, Rumania, Canada, Holland and the United States. Vassilev’s work has been written about extensively in art and photography publications worldwide. He has published a book of his photographs entitled Bulgarians, 1994 by Contrejour Publishers in Paris.

MANUEL CARRILLO

This exhibition of Manuel Carrillo, a legendary 20th Century Mexican photographer, includes newly acquired images shown for the first time. This body of work consists of Carrillo’s historic photographic masterpieces of Mexican culture in the period between 1950 and 1970. Images in this exhibition include explorations of daily life in central and coastal Mexico that include portraits of children, laborers, fishermen, and farmers.

Manuel Carrillo’s work was inspired by the American Modernist artists of his time, such as Edward Weston, Edward Steichen, Paul Strand and others that informed the aesthetics and politics of his photographic work.

“Manuel Carrillo’s relationship to his subject matter is a position based on his own cultural identity as a Mexican by birth and an American by processes of binational crossings that led to his induction as an honorary citizen of El Paso, Texas in 1980 by the Photographic Society of America. This position allowed him to move in and out of fixed constructs of identity that may have otherwise limited his visual interpretations.” [1]

Carrillo’s compassion, sensitivity and his understanding of a universal connection to the shared human experience produced stunning, poetic images of the Mexican culture that he passionately identified with as his own. “Mi Pueblo”(My People), depicting daily life in rural Mexico, was the title of his first international exhibition held in 1960 in Chicago.

Born in Mexico City in 1906, Manuel Carrillo’s destiny as interpreter of his own people would not be revealed until almost half a century later. At the age of 16, in 1922 Carrillo left Mexico for New York where he pursued several odd jobs before becoming an Arthur Murray waltz and tango champion. During this period in New York, he settled down to work for the Wall Street firm of Neuss Hesslein and Co., but in 1930 he returned to his beloved Mexico. There he began working for one of the pioneers of the Mexican tourist industry Albert L. Bravo. Carrillo later abandoned that position to become the general agent for the Illinois Central Railroad’s office in Mexico City, where he stayed for thirty-six years, until his retirement. At the age of 49, he joined the Club Fotografico de Mexico and the Photographic Society of America, thus launching his career in Photography. His first international exhibition, titled, “Mi Pueblo” (“My People”), was held in 1960 at the Chicago Public Library and depicted daily life in rural Mexico. Since 1975, Carrillo’s work has been seen in 209 individual exhibitions and 27 group exhibits in Mexico, the United States and around the world. His work has been published in a variety of photographic anthologies and journals. Carrillo died in Mexico City in 1989 at the age of 83. His archives are held at the University of Texas at El Paso’s Library.

[1] Revealing Personal Identity: The Indigenous Vision of Manuel Carrillo, 2003 (Writings from exhibition with Special Collections Department of the University of Texas at El Paso Library and the Smithsonian Center for Latino Initiatives.

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR STANKO ABADŽIC
Email: abadzicphoto@gmail.com
Phone: (Croatia) + 385 98 923 2530

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR JACKO VASSILEV
Email: jacko_vassilevart@yahoo.com
Phone: 323-376-0121

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR MANUEL CARRILLO: VERVE GALLERY OF PHOTOGRAPHY
Jennifer Schlesinger, Director
219 E. Marcy Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501
Email: jennifer@vervegallery.com
Phone: 505-982-5009 Fax: 505-982-9111

2011 Center Awards: Call for entries!


2011 CALL FOR ENTRIES CENTER AWARDS
Review Santa Fe, Project Competition, Project Launch, and the Choice Awards.
Deadline January 27, 2011
Connections members receive $10 off any one submission

PROJECT COMPETITION
$5,000 cash, exhibition, publication in Fraction magazine, admission to Review Santa Fe, and more.
JURORS – Simon Baker, Curator of Photography, Tate, U.K.; Alexa Becker,
Acquisitions Editor / Kehrer Verlag Heidelberg Publishers; Christina Cahill, Deputy Director, Editorial Reportage by Getty Images

PROJECT LAUNCH
$3,000 cash, exhibition, publication in Fraction magazine, admission to Review Santa Fe and more.
JUROR – Dewi Lewis, Publisher, Dewi Lewis Publishing, U.K.

CHOICE AWARDS
Exhibition at Center space, publication in Fraction magazine, gift certificate to Singer Editions fine art printing services
Curator’s Choice – Erin OToole, Asst. diamond rings . Comcast Deals . Curator of Photography, SF Museum of Modern Art
Dealer’s Choice – Dianne Vanderlip, Curator, Gagosian Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
Editor’s Choice – Todd James, Senior Photo Editor, National Geographic magazine

REVIEW SANTA FE
The premier juried portfolio review event in the country. Receive 9 portfolio reviews, inclusion in an on-line listing, receptions, a night of Portfolio Viewing and more; June 2-5, 2011 in Santa Fe, NM.