Author Archives: Olivier Laurent

Photojournalism Links’ Guide to Visa pour l’Image and Perpignan – Sunday 02 September 2012

Professional Week at Visa pour l’Image can be a daunting experience, especially if it’s your first time in Perpignan. At Photojournalism Links, we thought we would publish a short guide to the city, the festival and everything else that happens in Perpignan from 03 to 09 September, when thousands of photojournalists will converge on the French city.

In the map below, you’ll find the location of all the exhibitions and official festival events, but also a few other useful addresses such as where to find free Wifi or a supermarket. This map will be updated all week with addresses of the best restaurants, as well as the location of some open-to-the-general-public parties. If you are an agency, and are holding an event you would like us to flag up on the map, let us know at olivierclaurent[at]gmail[dot]com.

How do I get from the airport to the city centre?

There are taxis at the airport, but they can be expensive if you’re alone (and, anyway, there are not that many taxis there – not at all). But the city runs a bus shuttle. It costs around 5 and will get you there in around 20 minutes. Don’t miss it though, it won’t wait for you to finish your cigarette.

I just arrived in Perpignan, what do I do now?

Go to Palais des Congrs to get your official accreditation. It will also be the opportunity to get information about talks and events, as well as a list of all the exhibitions and evening screenings.

What are these evening screenings that everyone talk about?

Each evening, from 9.30PM, the festival presents a series of photography screenings at Campo Santos (see map above). Each screening is made up of two parts – one part recounts what has happened around the world in the previous 12 months, while the second part is dedicated to individual projects and photographers. On Friday and Saturday, the screenings can be watched from Place de la Rpublique, allowing you to have dinner at a reasonable pace while watching the show.

But all I want to do is meet editors to show them my work. How do I do this?

There are twopredominant spots where you can meet photo editors: on the second floor of the Palais des Congrs or on the 7th floor of that same building. The second floor is the official spot, where agencies will have stands as part of the festival’s media centre. There you can find agencies such as Getty Images, Agence VU’, EPA, Cosmos and Polaris among many others. A lot of these agencies will have a schedule of available times for free portfolio reviews. But, be there early to secure a space – for example, in Getty Images’ case, if you don’t show up as soon as the doors of the Palais des Congrs open, you will have missed your chance: within minutes all of the day’s spots will have been booked.

Your second option is the 7th floor of the Palais des Congrs, where photo editors for publications as prestigious as TIME, Newsweek, The New York Times and many other worldwide titles from Geo to National Geographic will get a table and look at photographers’ work. Most often, they have already booked meetings with photographers they know they want to see, but they will also allow, sometimes, for a queue to form up to see the work of other photographers. My advice is to know who they are. Don’t show up in front of them without knowing who they are. directory submission . With a bit of research on Google or even Facebook you should be able find out who is who. And it’s not because you have an opportunity to meet with the international photo editor at TIME that you should actually show him your work – know whether you are ready to meet that person and ask yourself if you will be wasting his time or not. Sometimes, photo editors will appreciate being told: “I don’t think my work is good enough right now, but could I get your business card for when it is?”

What is this Caf de la Poste that everyone is talking about?

Caf de la Poste has become one of the festival’s emblematic meeting points (see map above). In the beginning, this is where photojournalists on show at Visa would gather for a drink in the evenings. And year after year, they would be joined by other photographers, young and old, until the wee hours of the morning. Since the Caf is open 23 hours a day during professional week, you can expect to find photographers there even at 5AM, especially on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Oh, and by the way, the Caf makes 90% of its annual revenues that one week – photographers do like their drinks!

Who’s in Perpignan during Professional Week?

Visa pour l’Image has a great page on its site with the names of everyone that has checked-in at the Palais des Congrs to get their accreditation. Here it is: http://www.visapourlimage.com/professional/who_is_in_perpignan.do

Don’t make this one visit your last one.

If it’s your first year at Visa pour l’Image, be prepared. It. Is. Scary. You will find yourself among thousands of photographers who are, just like you, trying to make it in a very competitive market. My first year at Visa, five years ago, was dreadful. I didn’t know who to talk to, I didn’t know where to hang out, I didn’t know what to do. But don’t give up. Come back the following year, and the one after that. And you will get the hang of it. Also, next year is the festival’s 25th anniversary, and that’s one edition you won’t want to miss!

Any other tips?

  • Do not carry two camera bodies around your neck. This is a festival where you’re trying to sell your work and meet people, not report on it like you would a humanitarian crisis. If you really want to have a camera with you at all times, a compact camera will do, or even your iPhone. Also, you won’t run the risk of being mugged at 3am in the morning because you’re carrying $10,000 worth of kit around your neck…
  • If you are staying the entire week, remember this is the South of France: stores WILL be closed on Sundays. So if you’re planning a big feast on Sunday afternoon, visit the local supermarket on Saturday.
  • Find the time to see the exhibitions. Not only does it make sense, but it’s also a good way to find out what photographers like Stephanie Sinclair, Stanley Greene or Sebastian Liste look like – each exhibition carries a description of the work and a portrait of the photographer. It might come in handy when you’re at Caf de la Poste. Of course, that doesn’t mean you should introduce yourself to every single one of the exhibited photographers. Just like with photo editors, use your judgement before approaching someone.
  • Don’t miss Saturday night’s party at the Couvent des Minimes. Yes, the point system to get a drink is confusing, but it’s still good fun.
  • Perpignan isn’t far from the beach. You can get a bus from the Castillet or Palais des Congrs that gets you to Canet-Plage. The bus runs every hour, but don’t expect to get one past 8PM to go back to Perpignan, so don’t fall asleep on the beach! On your way back, there will be a lot of people trying to get back to Perpignan. Just remember that unlike in the UK and in the US, in France people don’t respect the queue, so expect to push and shove to get on the already-packed bus.

Interview: Nicole Tung on covering the battle for Aleppo

Earlier this month, TIME published A Syrian Tragedy: One Family’s Horror, a series of images shot by freelance photographer Nicole Tung. The images, shot in Aleppo as the Syrian city was under attack, portray civil casualties, highlighting how the war has torned apart families. For the past four months, Nicole has been documenting the uprising in Syria. Months before, she was in Libya, covering her first violent conflict at just 25.

Nicole started taking pictures when she was 15, living in Hong Kong, her hometown. “A good friend of mine, who also became a photographer, also served as one of my inspirations,” she says. “He showed me the first book in contemporary photojournalism that I clearly remember today, Winterreise by Luc Delahaye.” She studied journalism and history at New York University, and has since been published by The New York Times, TIME and Global Post among many other magazines and newspapers.

In an interview with Photojournalism Links, she tells us more about her work in Syria, how she gained access to the country and what she’s seen there.

Men carry the body of Hatem Qureya, 15, after he was trapped under rubble following an airstrike in the neighborhood of Bustan al Qasr in Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, August 6, 2012 which claimed at least eight lives including five children from the same family. Hatem later died at the field hospital. His father, mother, younger brother and sister and two younger cousins were also killed. Bustan al Qasr, a Free Syrian Army controlled district in south west Aleppo, has consistently been shelled and attacked by helicopters and planes over the last two weeks after the FSA entered Syria’s commercial capital and its most populated city. According to the UN, over 200,000 civilians have fled the city, whilst many other displaced remain inside, seeking refuge in mosques, parks, and schools. Bustan al Qasr remains almost fully populated by its residents who chose not to flee. Image © Nicole Tung.

Mikko Takkunen and Olivier Laurent: Why did you decide to go to Syria?

Nicole Tung: I decided to go to Syria because I felt that the coverage was lacking from the inside. But I was also personally curious and I wanted to fulfill something that the late Marie Colvin once said: “Our mission is to report these horrors of war with accuracy and without prejudice.” Marie was a friend and I felt that her death could not, should not, cow journalists from carrying out their missions. She would have been disappointed to know that her death was the reason so many decided to turn off from directly covering Syria. I admired her deeply, and felt the best way to honor her, and other colleagues killed in the past year was to continue working.

MT & OL: How did you manage to enter the country?

NT: I entered the country through Turkey, like many journalists do. Up until a few weeks ago, all the crossings in to Syria via Turkey had to be illegal. It involved some running across border areas with gear in hand, to avoid the Turkish military police.

MT & OL: How did you make your way to Aleppo?

NT: I first went to Aleppo city a week before the fighting began on July 20. I was in the Reef Aleppo (the country side), spending time in the towns there that were experiencing frequent helicopter and shelling attacks by the government forces. At that time, Aleppo was still in full control of the military, intelligence, and police units and getting in meant sneaking through back roads, avoiding the plentiful checkpoints, and high tailing it in to a safe house in the city. One could not really work as a photographer in Aleppo just four weeks ago– spies were everywhere and you were busy focusing on not sticking out, so having a camera in public, even out in the car, was absolutely out of the question.

The brother of Abdul Latif Qureya, 33, reads the Koran near his body after he was killed in an airstrike in the neighborhood of Bustan al Qasr in Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, August 6, 2012 which claimed at least eight lives including five children from the same family. Abdul Latif Qureya’s wife Wahiba, two sons, Hatem, 15, and Mahmoud, 14, and his 8-year-old daughter Bara’a as well as a neice, 7, and nephew, 1, were killed in the same airstrike. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: Was sending your work back to your editors a struggle? How did you manage it?

NT: When I went back to Aleppo as the fighting started, sending work back to editors was and is, certainly a struggle. Many of the activists there were caught off guard, I think, by the actual fighting having finally reached Aleppo. I saw a steady decline in the quality of communications over a three-week period. Phone networks in the city started to fail, and the 3G Internet the activists often relied on began to shut down too, besides the fact that it was very difficult to buy credit. Only a few, highly skilled activists could set up satellite Internet quickly enough, or run DSL connections out of still-government controlled areas of the city. Added to that was the severe electricity cuts that about 70% of the city was experiencing. I managed to send images out because of the Syrians, who would often go to the ends of the Earth to help me. They worked tirelessly to get a car, to get fuel for the car, to make sure the roads were safe, then worked to get you to a physical location in order to connect to the Internet. And then they stayed with you, drank tea and coffee with you, for hours on end while your files were beamed halfway across the world. It is a cumbersome way, but often the only way, to work in Syria. I have never experienced such patience and generosity from people who are themselves going through the darkest hours of their life.

MT & OL: Where you working with other photographers/journalists while there?

NT: I was working with one other videographer whilst I was there. It’s difficult to work in Syria in big groups because of the logistics. Also, in a dangerous situation, having too many opinions from too many colleagues often causes more problems.

MT & OL: Did you have an assignment before you left for Syria or were you confident you were going to get published once you were in the country?

NT: The first time I went into Syria at the end of May this year, I did not have an assignment. I was there to establish contacts and get a better idea of what things looked like on the ground. I went back several times, selling images to various publications before getting an assignment in June to go back in with Die Zeit. When I was not on assignment — I want to say I was confident, but in those situations you just never know — I knew for a fact that there were very few journalists covering Syria from the inside because of the dangers it posed and for logistical reasons. I thought that having a view from the ground might be somewhat valuable in itself.

Demonstrators shout slogans as they carry the bodies of nine civilians killed the night before by mortars fired on the city of Maarat Al Noman by the Syrian Army on Sunday, June 10, 2012. Estimates put the death toll between 20-30 people as many died on their way to Turkey for further medical treatment, and over 100 people were injured. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: Your work for TIME in Aleppo has received particular attention. Can you tell us about your experience on the ground in Aleppo?

NT: I witnessed the situation in Aleppo both before and after the fight for the city began on July 20. It was incredible to see the changes because the neighborhoods which are experiencing the heaviest fighting now, and which have been hardest hit, were the most defiant in terms of staging almost nightly demonstrations against the government even in a very tightly controlled city. When I first went there, checkpoints had been set up on all the main arteries of Aleppo. I moved around with doctors and activists who took incredible risks to do their jobs and added more risk by having a foreign journalist in their car. I couldn’t have my camera out at all, because there were pro-government militias known as ‘shebiha’ all around, and informers for the regime, as well. The only time I could take my camera out briefly was when I was at the demonstrations, running the risk that the protest would be broken up at any given time if the security forces open fired on the crowd, which they did very often.

I saw the Aleppo Underground as it was. There were doctors clandestinely treating injured protestors at private and sometimes public hospitals, and falsifying their medical reports (taking care not to write ‘gun shot wound’ or any other violence related injuries) to avoid scrutiny by security. There were pharmacists shuttling medical supplies in and out of the city to other affected areas around the country. Women who left the comfort of their middle-upper class life to deliver clothes, food, and formula to families who sought refuge in Aleppo from places like Homs and Hamah. One woman even counseled girls who had been raped. There were teenagers, all high school students, who dared to protest and were arrested, often tortured before being released and they were back on the streets the very next day protesting again. And then there were the Aleppo University students who became the heart of the uprising in city, through their shows of multiple, daily demonstrations in front of their faculties. They paid a high price for it, often getting beaten, shot at, and arrested by the security forces on campus. No less than one dozen students were killed on university grounds over the months of protests, and in June 2012, three medical students were found bound, shot, and their bodies burned for attempting to treat an injured protestor. The revolution was very much alive, and it was conducted almost completely through peaceful means. But finally, the war came to Aleppo, and since then, overcrowded neighborhoods have become ghost towns, the chatter and noise of daily life and children has given way to the sound of incoming mortar rounds, tank shells, the drone of helicopters and furious sound of diving fighter jets. Shelling in the contested areas of the city has no pattern and it is indiscriminate, often hitting civilians in their own homes. The Free Syrian Army has continued to pour in to the city. They have the advantage of knowing the streets and urban warfare is their forte. But they still lack weapons to make any real gain on the government forces. Civilians in some neighborhoods have fled to other parts of the city, to parks, university dormitories, and mosques whilst others have gone to Aleppo’s countryside. Some families have been displaced twice over as they left Hamah and Homs, only to be leaving their refuge in Aleppo. That was my experience in Aleppo: the situation was fluid, and working around it was incredibly difficult.

MT & OL: You concentrated a lot more on civilians rather than FSA fighters. Was this something you had decided beforehand or did it just happen?

NT: I did not decide beforehand that I would cover specifically civilians, but it became very apparent to me, once I was there, that it was necessary. The war is fought by two sides with particular, sometimes varying, agendas. Photographing combat is dangerously addictive to some people. I have a one-day tolerance for it when I’m there before I find that most of those images end up looking the same and provide little scope for what else is happening. Certainly the FSA is up against a violently disproportionate use of weapons but the civilians are the quiet sufferers of what happens on the battlefield. Assad’s forces don’t hesitate to kill them if they peacefully demonstrate or harbor FSA fighters in their neighborhoods. Often, the FSA base themselves there to try and protect the civilian population or use it as a point from which to attack the Syrian Army. But it’s the civilians who pay the price because they lose their lives and lose their homes. Sometimes there’s no reason at all for killing civilians. The worst is seeing children getting injured, or dying. For what, though? When I witnessed an airstrike last week that killed five children from the same family, it occurred to me that it was something beyond comprehension, beyond reason. At that point, agendas don’t matter at all.

Men gather at a graveyard on the outskirts of Anadan, Syria, on Friday, June 8, 2012 to bury Fawaz Omar Abdullah, 30, a civilian who was shot and killed by a Syrian Army sniper the day before as he was walking near a checkpoint in the village. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: How widely have your images been published?

NT: Certainly the advantage of having published with TIME is that many people see those images, and I have the editors there to thank for their support when I was working in an extremely difficult situation. They have since gone on to CNN, Human Rights Watch, Paris Match, other European publications and will also be screened at Visa Pour l’Image in September.

MT & OL: How different was covering Syria compared to Libya?

NT: Syria is far more dangerous and complicated than anything I ever experienced in Libya. Libya was the first combat zone I’d ever been to and I was lucky to have so many veteran journalists around who looked out for me and guided us younger photographers. We also shared rides with them and listened to (or more correctly, noted) their advice, followed them as they worked, and learned from them. I was fortunate to have security consultants lend me body armor and give me crash courses in first aid. Syria has none of those luxuries. I’ve since picked up my own body armor, took a combat medical training course, and made a fair number of my own contacts inside. You are on your own from beginning to end, and you cannot rely on anyone but yourself. The government’s use of fire power is unlimited. At least there was a no-fly zone very quickly established in Libya, but in Syria, anything goes. The people of Libya and Syria are not so different, though. I have met some of the most generous, warm hearted people working in both countries and their hospitality often knows no bounds.

MT & OL: Now that you are out of the country, what are your plans? Are you going back? Or will it prove difficult to go back?

NT: I will continue to go back to Syria because, like Libya, I have become committed to the story and the path of where the country will go. It will prove difficult going back only because of people’s concerns about my safety, which I certainly understand.

MT & OL: How do you see the situation evolving in Syria in the coming weeks?

NT: In the coming weeks, the fight for Aleppo will still be going on. The rebels there are no match to the forces of Assad, especially when they continuously run low on ammunition. The country is already in chaos when you think about how many millions are displaced by fighting, how many thousands of lives have been lost, and the amount of destruction this war has wrought, physically, financially, and emotionally. Added to that is the lack of unity from both political and military groups from the opposition. While Damascus and Aleppo become the biggest news stories, other cities near Idlib and Hamah continue to get pounded by government forces. And let’s say Assad were to be finished off tomorrow, what will a new government look like? Will minority groups be proportionately represented? And what about the regional implications of this war? These are all questions the Syrians are still wrestling with. Most don’t have answers that would satisfy the international community.

Nicole Tung’s images can be seen on TIME’s Lightbox here and here.

For more information about Nicole Tung, visit her website at www.nicoletung.com.

Articles | Sunday 17 June 2012

Let’s start with the unexpected news coming from Getty Images: Eugene Richards, the celebrated documentary photographer, has left the Reportage agency. Richards used to be with Magnum Photos but left twice. He was also with VII Photo for a couple of years, and had joined Reportage in 2010.

Reportage by Getty Images: Eugene Richards

BJP: Eugene Richards leaves Reportage by Getty Images

On the subject of Getty Images, they announced a few things these past few weeks.

PetaPixel: Getty Images Changes Watermark from Annoying Logo to Useful Shortlink

PDN Pulse: Getty Images Preps for IPO?

An interesting development in the photographic and multimedia markets, Brian Storm has started charging for some of MediaStorm’s presentation. Rite of Passage by Maggie Steber and A Shadow Remains by Phillip Toledano are the first two pieces to test MediaStorm’s Pay Per Story scheme. Each story can be bought for $1.99.

 

MediaStorm: Why We Switched to a Pay Per Story Model

PDN Pulse: MediaStorm Now Charging to View its Stories

TIME Lightbox: Game Changer – MediaStorm Launches Pay-Per-Story Video Player

Duckrabbit: Maggie Steber responds to critics of MediaStorm’s new pay to view model

VII Photo has been weathering a controversy lately…

VII Photo: Statement

Ron Haviv: Response

Conscientious: Quality journalism, photography and integrity

David Campbell: Photo agencies and ethics: the individual and the collective

And when we’re on the subject of VII Photo, they have also added four young photographers to their mentor programme.

Now, let’s share some business and practical tips:

Justin Mott: Advice to Veteran Photographers

A Photo Editor: How does a photographer land an agent?

A Photo Editor: Pricing & Negotiation: Spokesperson Advertising Shoot

PhotoShelter: A Photographer’s Guide to a Successful Gallery Opening

PhotoShelter: What Buyers and Photo Editors Want

PhotoShelter: Personality Traits & Skills Photo Buyers Don’t Want in Photographers

Salon: How to stop the bleeding

Chris Hondros. Image © Nicole Tung

PetaPixel: US Department of Justice Defends Photographers’ Right to Record Police

Some thoughts about the industry, reviews and round-ups…

The New York Times: Just When You Got Digital Technology, Film is Back

TIME Lightbox: Three War Photographers: Feel Fear, Keep Going

NY Daily News: Iconic ‘napalm girl’ photo from Vietnam War turns 40

Peter Dench: The Dench Diary (December – February 2012)

Conscientious: Review of Unknown Quantities by Olivia Arthur, Dominic Nahr, Moises Saman, and Peter Van Agtmael

PhotoShelter: The Look3 Festival Round-Up

TIME Lightbox: Curators Look Ahead to Look3

PDN Pulse: Look3 – Alex Webb on his Creative Process, Kodachrome, and Magnum

PDN Pulse: Look 3 Report: Donna Ferrato on Philip Jones Griffiths, Don McCullin, and Complicated Relationships

Reuters Blog: The Secret Handshake

The Guardian: Burtynsky: Oil review

Image © Edward Burtynsky.

The Guardian: The Photographers’ Gallery Reopens

NYT Lens Blog: Caught Between the Protests and the Police

NYT Lens Blog: Half Photos, Striving to be More

NYT Lens Blog: A Gift to New York from Gordon Parks

The New Yorker Photo Booth: Great Mistakes: Olivia Arthur

The Guardian: Featured Photojournalist – Joe Raedle

Conscientious Extended: Photography and Place: Appalachia

One Image at a Time: Image #4, Comfort Women 1996

DVAPhoto: Worth a look: Revolution Revisited by Kim Komenich and University of Miami multimedia grad students

Press Association: Jacobs in administration

Verve Photo: Antonio Bolfo

The Guardian: Lawrence Schiller’s best photograph: Marilyn Monroe

TIME Lightbox: Photographs of the ‘Great British Public’ in London

Foam Blog: Ahmet Polat on Instagram

Reuters Blog: Tribute to Danilo Krstanovic

And to finish…

The Marie Colvin Memorial Fund.

Image of the Month – Dominic Nahr for TIME

This image  from Sudan (used here with the photographer’s permission), which portrays a soldier of the northern regime’s army, the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF), dead, immersed in oil next to a leaking petroleum facility in Heglig, was taken by Magnum Photos member Dominic Nahr for TIME. The magazine ran it double truck end of April to open Alex Perry’s article titled Sudan’s Spiral Back to War. When Mikko and I saw it, we agreed it was one of the most visually and contextually striking images we’d seen in weeks – and so, it made sense for us to select it to kickstart our new monthly showcase.

Writing for TIME, Dominic explained how he came to photograph this dead soldier. “In Heglig, days before it was retaken by the northern army, I wandered over to the nearby oil installations hoping to capture photos of the destruction. There were bodies of dead northern soldiers all over the place. As I got closer to the pipeline I saw a corpse lying in a thick slick of oil, glistening in the sun. The soldier’s head was resting on his arms and I couldn’t see any injuries: it looked like he was sleeping.” Read more about it on the TIME Lightbox website.

We’ve asked Dominic to share with Photojournalism Links his personal feelings about the image. He had this to say: “When I see civilians that have been killed, my body aches, knowing that something horrible has happened. With soldiers it is slightly different. I had been photographing more than a dozen bodies that day, most of which were torn to pieces. You go into work mode, I remember I was photographing this body that almost didn’t look real, I framed it in a very direct way. When I got back to look at it I was shocked to see that I thought that would be an ok picture to have published or shown. It was very far from being useable. When I saw the body in the oil, i really thought the soldier looked like he was sleeping, so in a way it was a lot more calming than the other situations I had documented that day. It felt like for the moment I was there, time stopped.”

Photo Editor of the Month: Emma Bowkett of FT Weekend Magazine

As part of Photojournalism Links’s relaunch, we’re introducing new and regular columns, with the goal of exploring further the inner-workings of the photojournalism community. One such column is dedicated to Photo Editors. Far from being a Hall of Fame-type of chronicle, it’s a way for us to introduce photo editors that are using photography in intelligent and creative ways. We’re also mindful that a lot of our readers are students and emerging photographers, who might not always know how photo editors work and how, and when, they can be approached. Hopefully, this column will help them, while informing others about the work of particular photo editors.

This month, we’re starting with Emma Bowkett, the photo editor for the Financial Times Weekend Magazine.

Photo © Kalpesh Lathigra.

Photojournalism Links: How did you get started in photography? How did you end up being a photo editor for Financial Times?

Emma Bowkett: Graduating from Goldsmiths College in 2005 with an MA in Image and Communication, I took an internship at the Victoria & Albert Museum, archiving prints for their Word and Image department. Then I worked for two years as first assistant to an advertising photographer, before teaching on the degree course at Goldsmiths. This was a term-time position, so I started freelance picture editing at the Financial Times. I developed a good working relationship with the art director on the FT Weekend Magazine. She kept asking me back.

Photojournalism Links: How do you use photography for the FT Weekend Magazine?

Emma Bowkett: We re-launched the magazine in 2010 with greater emphasis on photography. Most of the photography in the magazine is commissioned. We are a weekly publication with a short lead-time. Stories are often timed to events and news stories, so we are able to commission photographers to work on assignments, as well as publishing photo essays, previews of photo exhibitions and books. I work closely with the AD’s, photographers and agents to produce concepts. Ideas are pitched to my editor, and usually run over six or eight pages. We are encouraged to be ambitious with both images and design.

Photojournalism Links: What are you looking for in the photographers that you use? What attracts you to a certain photographer over another?

Emma Bowkett: I’m looking for photographers with a sense of authorship to their work. I see a lot of folios, sometimes there’s just a special something that attracts me.

Photojournalism Links: Do you mostly use to local photographers for international assignments? Are there cases, when you would send someone abroad?

Emma Bowkett: Much of the photography I commission is international. I usually work with photographers on the ground. That said, there are circumstances where we fly someone in, if we are looking for a specific style [we’ll] use a specific photographer.

Photojournalism Links: How do you discover new photographers?

Emma Bowkett: Galleries, social media sites, magazines, blogs, agents, recommendations. I try to see two photographers’ books a week because I like talking to photographers about their personal projects face to face when I can. Attending private views, talks, and events are a good way to meet new photographers and build relationships.

Photojournalism Links: Are there one or several photographers that have impressed you in the past year? And why?

Emma Bowkett: I am continually impressed by photography. There are several photographers I could mention; many are regular contributors to the magazine. I’d like to mention Stan Douglas, who I recently discovered, and is this year’s recipient of ICP’s Infinity Award for Art. He recently exhibited in London and in New York. We ran his series, Midcentury Studio, in the magazine.  I was lucky enough to see both shows. I’m interested in his concept of taking on the identity of a photojournalist, constructing scenes and narratives, challenging fact and fiction. I really love his work.

FT Weekend Magazine © Stan Douglas, Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, New York and Victoria Miro, London.

FT Weekend Magazine © Stan Douglas, Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, New York and Victoria Miro, London.

FT Weekend Magazine © Stan Douglas, Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner, New York and Victoria Miro, London.

Photojournalism Links: What is the last photo book that you’ve bought?

Emma Bowkett: I have just bought WassinkLundgren’s Empty Bottles and Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs.

Photojournalism Links: If you could hire any photographer, who would it be?

Emma Bowkett: I was just in contact with Sølve Sundsbø’s agent about a possible cover shoot. It didn’t work out, but I’d still like to work with him. I have a wish list of photographers. The best thing about my job is working with photographers I admire.

Photojournalism Links: What are your hobbies outside of photography?

Emma Bowkett: I go to the movies as much as I can. I cycle and go the gym.

Photojournalism Links: How can photographers reach you?

Emma Bowkett: Email, Twitter or Facebook. The same way I find them.

Articles | Saturday 19 May 2012

Olivier writing here. This is my first post for Photojournalism Links. I’ve been a long-time follower of Mikko’s work, which has, over the years, proved to be an amazing resources for photojournalists and photo editors. It’s my pleasure to help Mikko update and develop the site further, and we’re already planning new things for the site. Stay tuned.

Let’s get started.

First things first, if you happen to be in London this coming week, head for the Frontline Club, which is holding a series of photography events, including VII Photo’s seminar (Hint: if you’re looking to buy the agency’s latest book Questions Without Answers, you’ll get the opportunity to get it signed by a lot of the their photographers!) Reportage by Getty Images will also be there with a couple of events, including a discussion with Peter Dench, Tom Stoddart and Aidan Sullivan. Finally, on 24 May, there’s the Panos Pictures Networking Party.

Washington Post: Vogue’s flattering article on Syria’s first lady is scrubbed from Web. The images used by Vogue were shot by James Nachtwey. A copy of the article is hosted by a website called President Assad here. In the Washington Post’s article, it’s mentioned that Assad’s children aren’t actually his but decoys planted for security reasons.

Examiner: The picture of dishonesty: social media slaps down a wedding photo faker.

Walk Your Camera: Perpetuating the Visual Myth of Appalachia – or how a photographer reacts to a very bad edit, done by CNN, of her work.

Martin Parr: Too Much Photography.

Photobooth at The New Yorker: Will Steacy’s Photographs Not Taken continues to make the rounds, this time with The New Yorker publishing Nina Berman’s story of Cathy, who she met in London in the 1990s.

Cover of “Photographs Not Taken”

PBS: Photojournalists Scramble to Video. Is it worth it? 

“Video storytelling is different in execution than still photography, without a doubt. But it has been well-established that very talented still photographers can make the transition back and forth between the media and enhance their visual reporting,” says Sean D. Elliot, president of the National Press Photographers Association.

A Photo Editor: Is it Time to Eliminate Stills From Your Shoot?

BJP: Lange-Taylor Prize Gets a Facelift, relaunches in 2013.

A lot of talk about Hipstamatic, Instagram, and all-things Lomography in recent weeks, especially since Facebook paid $1.2bn for Instagram, so here we go:

NYT Lens: Benjamin Lowy: Virtually Unfiltered. The article that brought back the whole Hipstamatic debate on the table.

Conscientious: On the Hipstamatic Journalist. Joerg Colberg wonders how The New York Times can publish Hipstamatic images without it violating its strict rules about photo manipulation.

NYT: Everyone’s Lives, in Instagram Pictures. Karen Rosenberg tries to answer the question: “Why do we want to tweak our pictures so conspicuously?”

NYT: Lomography, an Analog Company Surviving in a Digital World.

Time Lightbox: Lomography and the “Analogue Future”.

San Francisco Chronicle: Hipstamatic Founders Lucas Buick, Ryan Dorshorst. An interview with the founders of the controversial app, and their plans for the future, including the release of an iPad magazine with interviews of star photographers using Hipstamatic.

Slate: In Defense of Instagram: Why News Photography Goes Well With Vintage-Filtered Cat Pic. An older article (March 2012), but felt it was needed in this context.

PetaPixel: IKEA Cardboard Camera Called KNAPPA To Land on Store Shelves Soon. Even Ikea is going into the cheap digital camera market.

BJP: New app bring lossless “developed raw” images to the iPhone.

Even about Instagram and Hipstamatic. Last week, there was an auction to help the family of Anton Hammerl, who was killed in Libya a year ago.

BBC: War photographer Anton Hammerl remembered at auction. A video of the auction and interviews with family, friends and colleagues.

NYT Lens: At Christie’s, an Auction for Anton.

Time Lightbox: Robert Capa, Friend of Anton.

Talking about Robert Capa…

The Guardian: Robert Capa and Gerda Taro: love in a time of war.

In Spain, Capa soon developed a reputation for taking photographs whatever the risk, setting the tone for war reportage as we now know it. Taro, too, was often seen running across the battle lines with her camera, her bravery matched by her recklessness. She travelled back and forth to the frontlines, shooting what she saw, often driven by a mixture of humanity, political commitment and a shrewd understanding of the power of the photograph to shape public opinion.

Fred Stein Archive/Getty Images

Time Lightbox: Overseas Press Club Award Winners Announced. Including the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award, which went to André Liohn.

Channel 4 News: Death in a time of life. Jon Snow remembers Marie Colvin, who was killed in Syria earlier this year.

NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Horst Faas.

Photo by Horst Faas / AP Photo.

PDN: Horst Faas, AP Combat Photographer, Dies age 79.

Panos Pictures: Robin Hammond Released From Prison in Zimbabwe. After being held for two weeks in Zimbabwe, Robin Hammond has been released and is back in Paris, safe and sound. I’m looking forward to seeing the images he came back with after spending two years documenting this country.

NYT Lens: A Ride Cloaked in Secrecy. I love this kind of articles, giving us a behind-the-scenes look at the news, especially when it has a West Wing kind of vibe. Here, we get the background on how a photographer reported on President Obama’s secretive trip to Afghanistan.

The Guardian: What happens when a photojournalist travels to revisit his subjects?

NYT Lens: The Eddie Adams Workshop’s 25th Year.

NYT Lens: Touring the Nanny-Photographer’s Past. Yet another article about Vivian Maier.

Chicago Tribune: The Great John H. White.

Firecracker: Olivia Arthur. Chosen for her excellent Jeddah Diary, the photographer’s first book.

Photo by Olivia Arthur.

The Guardian: Richard Mosse’s best shot.

Photo by Richard Mosse / Institute.

The Guardian: Saatchi captures the confusion of contemporary photography.

“The title, Out of Focus, may have been meant ironically, but it takes on a more pointed meaning if you approach the show as a mirror of the fractured world of contemporary practice.”

Wall Street Journal: The Surreal Selling of Man Ray.

PhotoShelter: Photography Through the Eyes of Art Directors.

PhotoShelter: The 40+ Items Every Photography Assistants Needs Now.

A few articles about photographers’ rights and copyrights:

Time Lightbox: Fight for Your Right: Resources for Photographers Covering Protests (note: it’s mainly for US-based photographers).

Nancy L. Ford Blog: Why NOT to give away your copyrights.

BJP: More than $120,000,000 at stake in AFP v. Morel case.

The Russian Photos Blog: Agence France Presse vs Morel: “AFP Got Caught With A Hand In The Cookie Jar And Will Have To Pay” Out of 200 pages of legal documents filed by both Daniel Morel and Agence France-Presse / Getty Images, this sentence, written by an AFP employee is by far the one that caught the attention of the industry. I’ve used it in my standfirst as well, and A Photo Editor picked up as well.

BJP: Leica introduces a black-and-white digital M9 camera.

And to finish, a 100-minute documentary about Helmut Newton from Frames From The Edge. Of course, it’s best watched in full-screen.

And a 60-minute interview with Michele Hadlow, Forbes’ Senior Photo Editor on How to Shoot Powerful Portraits of Powerful People.

Finally, congratulations to photographers Karim Ben Khelifa and Finbarr O’Reilly. Both have been selected as International Nieman Fellows for the Class of 2013 at Harvard. Ben Khelifa will “conduct research on journalist-audience engagement, analyze the behavioral economics linked to crowdfunding and study new business models promoting the diversification of visual storytelling.” While O’Reilly will “study psychology to better understand how the human mind and behavior is affected by personal experience, with a focus on trauma and conflict zones.”