Author Archives: Mr. Whiskets

Huge Art and Photobook Sale in Chelsea, NYC

When: Friday September 30th, Saturday October 1st from 10am to 5pm each day AND Sunday October 2nd from 12 to 5pm.

Where: 526 West 26th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues in Chelsea, Manhattan. napa auto parts . luxury travel agency . Studio/Room 507 on the 5th floor.

5B4 is parting with hundreds of photography and art books that are priced to sell. Many are rare and out of print, some signed or inscribed by the artists. Have been collecting for 25 years and now parting with a selection of my library.

Also, rare art and photography posters, postcards and photo exhibition ephemera.

Also, dozens of books of literature, fiction and non-fiction.

Also, many picture frames in a variety of sizes.


Also, 16×20 and 20×24 darkroom four blade enlarging easels.

Stop by and say hello, buy a book, and be happy.

Five books in a suitcase

While in Europe a couple months ago for the Rencontres d’Arles festival I found quite a few interesting items and as I look over them I see my tastes have drawn me to almost as many non-photobooks as photo-related ones. As I speak to other photobook obsessives I find a common denominator – it is harder and harder to find the “fix.”

The first is the new Enrique Metinides book Series from Kominek Books. Metinides is often referred to as the “Mexican Weegee.” Metinides worked as a newspaper photographer and many of his gritty, often gruesome images were used in the ‘nota roja’ tabloids. This book concentrates less on his individual greatest hits but on series of images he made while photographing crime, accidents and natural disasters in Mexico City and surrounding areas. The work is given an interesting design treatment courtesy of Syb (Sybren Kuiper) one of the leading Dutch designers working today. By far, it is the best presentation of Metinides work to date. Highly recommended.

Gregoire Pujade-Lauraine’s The Significant Savages was another choice which had a strong following at this year’s Rencontres d’Arles festival. Included in the exhibition From Here On which was curated by Martin Parr, Joan Fontcuberta, Joachim Schmid, Erik Kessels and Clement Cheroux, The Significant Savages compiles hundreds of “profile images” from the social networking site Facebook and presents them in an extremely handsome package that comments on how we see ourselves and how we present ourselves to the larger community. In part it is a critique but it does not lose its empathy with a cooler than thou vibe that is all too common with other archives of kitsch and stock imagery.

The next book, Nicolas Giraud’s All Work and No Play from Boa Books is probably the oddest choice I was completely compelled to bring home. Over several years, Giraud created his own “phantom literature book,” a typescript version of the “manuscript” that Jack Torrence (Jack Nicholson) was working on in Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining. Part fiction and part concrete poem, All Work and No Play sits in the obsessive space between an ordered mind and one that is unravelling. It might at first sound like a book that strikes a single note but design and typography freaks will want to take a long look at this deceptively simple work.

Aymeric Fouquez’s Nord from Kodoji Press is another that made the long haul back to NYC. Fouquez photographed WWI memorials built on actual battle sites in the north of France that were designed by the British architect Sir Edmund Luytens. Protected by law until 2018, these memorials sit in landscapes that are slowly developing and where modern real estate interests could threaten their existence. Politics, history, memory and loss all hang in the mist that enshrouds many of these skillfully made images. Each book comes with a small signed “self-portrait” print of Fouquez as a child on one of the many family outings to these gravesites.

The last in this set of books is Ricardo Cases’s Paloma al Aire. This has become one of my favorites, describing a small group of ‘pigeon racing’ men in Spain. Using brilliantly colored paint, these men color their birds with identifying marks on their wings and bellies and set them off to chase a female. Shot with flash, Cases turns these normally everyday creatures into exotic beings that apparently wind up coming to rest in bushes and trees, putting their owners through their own paces in order to retrieve them. Humorous and quirky, I can’t leaf through this spiral bound book without feeling light and giddy over creatures I mostly find repulsive.

More to come…

Five books in a suitcase

While in Europe a couple months ago for the Rencontres d’Arles festival I found quite a few interesting items and as I look over them I see my tastes have drawn me to almost as many non-photobooks as photo-related ones. As I speak to other photobook obsessives I find a common denominator – it is harder and harder to find the “fix.”

The first is the new Enrique Metinides book Series from Kominek Books. Metinides is often referred to as the “Mexican Weegee.” Metinides worked as a newspaper photographer and many of his gritty, often gruesome images were used in the ‘nota roja’ tabloids. This book concentrates less on his individual greatest hits but on series of images he made while photographing crime, accidents and natural disasters in Mexico City and surrounding areas. The work is given an interesting design treatment courtesy of Syb (Sybren Kuiper) one of the leading Dutch designers working today. By far, it is the best presentation of Metinides work to date. Highly recommended.

Gregoire Pujade-Lauraine’s The Significant Savages was another choice which had a strong following at this year’s Rencontres d’Arles festival. Included in the exhibition From Here On which was curated by Martin Parr, Joan Fontcuberta, Joachim Schmid, Erik Kessels and Clement Cheroux, The Significant Savages compiles hundreds of “profile images” from the social networking site Facebook and presents them in an extremely handsome package that comments on how we see ourselves and how we present ourselves to the larger community. In part it is a critique but it does not lose its empathy with a cooler than thou vibe that is all too common with other archives of kitsch and stock imagery.

The next book, Nicolas Giraud’s All Work and No Play from Boa Books is probably the oddest choice I was completely compelled to bring home. Over several years, Giraud created his own “phantom literature book,” a typescript version of the “manuscript” that Jack Torrence (Jack Nicholson) was working on in Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining. Part fiction and part concrete poem, All Work and No Play sits in the obsessive space between an ordered mind and one that is unravelling. It might at first sound like a book that strikes a single note but design and typography freaks will want to take a long look at this deceptively simple work.

Aymeric Fouquez’s Nord from Kodoji Press is another that made the long haul back to NYC. Fouquez photographed WWI memorials built on actual battle sites in the north of France that were designed by the British architect Sir Edmund Luytens. Protected by law until 2018, these memorials sit in landscapes that are slowly developing and where modern real estate interests could threaten their existence. Politics, history, memory and loss all hang in the mist that enshrouds many of these skillfully made images. Each book comes with a small signed “self-portrait” print of Fouquez as a child on one of the many family outings to these gravesites.

The last in this set of books is Ricardo Cases’s Paloma al Aire. This has become one of my favorites, describing a small group of ‘pigeon racing’ men in Spain. Using brilliantly colored paint, these men color their birds with identifying marks on their wings and bellies and set them off to chase a female. Shot with flash, Cases turns these normally everyday creatures into exotic beings that apparently wind up coming to rest in bushes and trees, putting their owners through their own paces in order to retrieve them. Humorous and quirky, I can’t leaf through this spiral bound book without feeling light and giddy over creatures I mostly find repulsive.

More to come…

Yesterday’s Pictures #4 by Gunther Karl Bose



Longtime readers of 5B4 will know I have continuously sung the praises of the Institut fur Buchkunst in Leipzig. The quality of the books they publish, most often by their students and instructors, have earned a special place on my shelves because of their content and clever design. Not to mention that some of the books (at 10-35 euros) are so absurdly cheap to acquire for their quality.

One recent series of “publications” I discovered last year is by the graphic designer and instructor at the Institute Gunther Karl Bose. I put the word publications in quotes because these are more single image works of art than a traditional “book”. Yesterday’s Pictures is a small series of images Bose has produced from his archive of 1960s-70s advertising images which are backed in linen and which unfold like a map from the delicate size of 4X6 inches to approximately 16X20.

My favorite so far is Yesterday’s Pictures #4 whose title is Miller Beer Six-Pack. Denver Web Design . The original image was created in 1960 by a commercial firm in Milwaukee Wisconsin called Genack Studio and shows a slightly larger than life pair of man’s hands assembling (or disassembling) the cardboard container of a six-pack of Miller Beer bottles. Simple and straight forward? Yes and no. The linen gaps break the overall picture into a grid contributing additional lines and angles to an already dimensionally complicated photo.

Other images in the series I found to be a bit more kitsch heavy – two 1960s-era nude women photographing each other, a woman holding up a color chart, and a Chinese bottle of coca-cola. All of the images are from the personal archive of Gunther Karl Bose.

Yesterday’s Pictures are a little more expensive at 40 euros each but they are in very small editions of 20 per image. I am not sure where to buy them as I have only seen them at the Kassel Fotobook festival and there is no ordering information online via the Institute or anywhere else. If I find out more information, I’ll post it in the comments section.

Yesterday’s Pictures #4 by Gunther Karl Bose



Longtime readers of 5B4 will know I have continuously sung the praises of the Institut fur Buchkunst in Leipzig. The quality of the books they publish, most often by their students and instructors, have earned a special place on my shelves because of their content and clever design. Not to mention that some of the books (at 10-35 euros) are so absurdly cheap to acquire for their quality.

One recent series of “publications” I discovered last year is by the graphic designer and instructor at the Institute Gunther Karl Bose. I put the word publications in quotes because these are more single image works of art than a traditional “book”. Yesterday’s Pictures is a small series of images Bose has produced from his archive of 1960s-70s advertising images which are backed in linen and which unfold like a map from the delicate size of 4X6 inches to approximately 16X20.

My favorite so far is Yesterday’s Pictures #4 whose title is Miller Beer Six-Pack. The original image was created in 1960 by a commercial firm in Milwaukee Wisconsin called Genack Studio and shows a slightly larger than life pair of man’s hands assembling (or disassembling) the cardboard container of a six-pack of Miller Beer bottles. Simple and straight forward? Yes and no. The linen gaps break the overall picture into a grid contributing additional lines and angles to an already dimensionally complicated photo.

Other images in the series I found to be a bit more kitsch heavy – two 1960s-era nude women photographing each other, a woman holding up a color chart, and a Chinese bottle of coca-cola. All of the images are from the personal archive of Gunther Karl Bose.

Yesterday’s Pictures are a little more expensive at 40 euros each but they are in very small editions of 20 per image. body lift . I am not sure where to buy them as I have only seen them at the Kassel Fotobook festival and there is no ordering information online via the Institute or anywhere else. If I find out more information, I’ll post it in the comments section.

Drawings on a Bus, 1954 by Ellsworth Kelly



After the Kassel festival I suffered from a bit of photobook burnout. bed bugs extermination . The festival is growing to a decent size but 4 twelve hour days looking and talking about books can send even the most dedicated to seek a break. So, I wanted to intersperse a few non-photo related books over the next weeks which I found irresistible on this trip.

The first is a book which was published by Matthew Marks Gallery and Steidl in 2007 and can be found at a very cheap price on some remainder tables in Europe – Ellsworth Kelly: Drawings on a Bus, 1954. My copy set me back a measly 12 euros.

After six years in Paris, Kelly returned to New York in 1954 where a friend gave him a hardcover publisher’s dummy of an old Sigfried Giedion Bauhaus book from the 20s thinking the blank pages would be perfect for sketching.

While riding the bus, this sketchbook (number #23), was filled with the chance drawings of the bus window shadows as they fell across the pages. Quickly marking the pages with the various changing shadows, he later inked in the outlines at his studio. Some of these sketches he later developed into larger paintings.

Abstract and in bold black and white they define the space on the page with graphic impulsive gestures which seem closer to typography than a response to simple light and dark patterns on the paper. The sequence reveals the pages filling with more black giving the sense of zooming in on the subtle nuances of these shadow/letter forms until an oval void spread across facing pages punctuates the ending.

The size of the book, the cardboard slipcase, printing and length feel near perfect. The fact that the blue cover – originally designed by the great Laszlo Moholy-Nagy for Giedion’s book Bauen in Eisenbeton, Bauen in Eisen, Bauen in Frankreich – remains intact with Moholy-Nagy’s typography and design suits the content in resonant ways.

Drawings on a Bus, 1954 by Ellsworth Kelly



After the Kassel festival I suffered from a bit of photobook burnout. houses for sale . The festival is growing to a decent size but 4 twelve hour days looking and talking about books can send even the most dedicated to seek a break. So, I wanted to intersperse a few non-photo related books over the next weeks which I found irresistible on this trip.

The first is a book which was published by Matthew Marks Gallery and Steidl in 2007 and can be found at a very cheap price on some remainder tables in Europe – Ellsworth Kelly: Drawings on a Bus, 1954. My copy set me back a measly 12 euros.

After six years in Paris, Kelly returned to New York in 1954 where a friend gave him a hardcover publisher’s dummy of an old Sigfried Giedion Bauhaus book from the 20s thinking the blank pages would be perfect for sketching.

While riding the bus, this sketchbook (number #23), was filled with the chance drawings of the bus window shadows as they fell across the pages. Quickly marking the pages with the various changing shadows, he later inked in the outlines at his studio. Some of these sketches he later developed into larger paintings.

Abstract and in bold black and white they define the space on the page with graphic impulsive gestures which seem closer to typography than a response to simple light and dark patterns on the paper. The sequence reveals the pages filling with more black giving the sense of zooming in on the subtle nuances of these shadow/letter forms until an oval void spread across facing pages punctuates the ending.

The size of the book, the cardboard slipcase, printing and length feel near perfect. The fact that the blue cover – originally designed by the great Laszlo Moholy-Nagy for Giedion’s book Bauen in Eisenbeton, Bauen in Eisen, Bauen in Frankreich – remains intact with Moholy-Nagy’s typography and design suits the content in resonant ways.

L.A. Women by Joachim Schmid



One of the foundations of Joachim Schmid’s work is the thought that there are way too many photographs in the world already so why not put those that exist to some intelligent use. At least, let us look at them a second time and contemplate their existence, or recontextualize them and introduce further questions of what we look at, what we draw in meaning, and what are the lasting values of the images. His latest book L.A. Women has a darker, real life context which is why I have chosen it as a follow up to Watabe Yukichi’s A Criminal Investigation.

In December 2010, the Los Angeles Police Department released 180 photographs of women found in the home of a known serial murder suspect. The release of the images was a public appeal for help in identifying the women who might be missing and those still alive as the known victims number only a dozen. The photographs do not tell which are which, they provide only a pool of possibility.

Without the context of sensational serial murder attached, the images appear to be innocuous portraits made with poor quality film, digital and video cameras. All are black women but for two whites. Some would look like pictures that people post to Facebook pages or snapped by friends. Many of the women smile, some appear asleep, many sit in the passenger seats of cars. A few of the images reveal small clues that some of the women might be exposing their breasts to the photographer although none of the croppings reveal any nudity.

With the context of being attached to the suspect, we search for grim clues. Many of which appear to have been taken in the back of a van. We notice that the rear windows have been masked with opaque paper or tinfoil. Some might be prostitutes but as Schmid says in his introduction, “We don’t know,” not even if the suspect took the images himself. One is snapped standing outside of the vehicle through the open passenger side window. She smiles as if stopping to chat with a neighbor. Does she know the driver or is the smile an automatic instinctual response to the camera? Is she being enticed into the car? offered a ride? In another, the photographer casts a shadow as he(?) frames a vertical but nothing is revealed that might lead the investigation. We feel the pull of information but are left dangling within the eeriness of the images.

We stare into the faces, some blurred by technical imperfections, and are confused by their calm expressions and smiles. We know the potential of the situation they are frozen within and for a moment we connect on a basic human level for survival – to warn and protect. Or, perhaps like viewing an image of a person before execution, we look to feel fear and master death one image at a time.

L.A. Women is available through Blurb. Joachim Schmid is a part of the ABC (Artists’ Book Cooperative) which is currently the subject of a show at New York’s Printed Matter.