Author Archives: Audrey

CBS Chicago Puts MoCP at the Top of Its "Best Photography Galleries in Chicago"

Press releases SEO . article writing submission . Thank you to our friends at CBS Chicago for ranking us first in its rundown of the best photo-centric venues in the city!

CBS Chicago Puts MoCP at the Top of Its "Best Photography Galleries in Chicago"

Links backlinks blog comments . squido lense . Thank you to our friends at CBS Chicago for ranking us first in its rundown of the best photo-centric venues in the city!

MoCP Re-Opens on Sundays

php3sK2CJPM.jpgBeen missing your weekends at the MoCP? Starting this Sunday, the MoCP will re-open from noon to 5 p.m. on Sundays, allowing photography enthusiasts and the general public access to our collection of renowned local, national and international photographers. Our newest exhibition, Crime Unseen, opens on Friday and will be on display through January 15, 2012. no deposit bonus .

Chicago Astronomer Joe Guzman shows what the naked eye cannot see during Beyond Visibility

Last week, we invited you to come out and see stars with us in Grant Park. This week, Chicago Astronomer Joe Guzman posted his photos of the event, which was held in conjunction with the MoCP’s current exhibition, Our Origins. If you haven’t seen it yet, Our Origins runs through Saturday.

If you’d like to see more photos of the event, visit Guzman’s blog. In the meantime, thank you all for coming out and enjoy the photos!

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All photos courtesy of Joe Guzman

Seeing Stars: Artist Lecture and Stargazing at the MoCP

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Aspen Mays, Punched Out Stars, Silver Gelatin Print, 2011

Throughout history, humans have devised countless ways to make sense of the universe surrounding them. Tomorrow evening, artist Aspen Mays, Ph.D Kathryn Schaffer and astronomer Joe Guzman will examine two of the most prominent instruments for studying the universe today: the telescope and the camera.

In conjunction with Our Origins, which is on display at the MoCP through October 16, Mays and Schaffer will discuss the similar ways scientists and artists search for insight into the broad expanses of the universe: by examining with a keen eye and intelligent insight.

Beginning at 6 p.m., Our Origins curator Allison Grant will moderate the conversation between Mays, whose past work is steeped scientific exploration and anthropological awareness, and Schaffer, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Chicago whose experience includes stargazing with the South Pole Telescope.

At 8 p.m., guests will be escorted across the street to Grant Park, where Guzman will host a stargazing session.

At the event, we will be selling archival inkjet prints of Map of the World (after Buckminster Fuller), Aspen Mays’ 2011 selection from the MoCP’s Fine Print Program.

Admission is free and open to the public. While it is not mandatory to RSVP, it can be done via our Facebook page.

MoCP in the News: Press for Our Origins

“Where do we, as humans, come from?” With such a broad question at the heart of Our Origins, it’s no wonder the exhibition has gotten people talking. From art critics to bloggers, take a look at what people are saying about Our Origins, which is on display at the MoCP through October 16:

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Jennifer Ray, Strangler Fig Embrace, 2009; Courtesy of the artist

“Inspired by everything from fossils to x-ray diffusion, this ambitious group show considers the unanswerable questions — all from a very self-conscious, often very funny point of view.” – Flavor Pill Chicago

“The chatter about where we come from seems inescapable. Which is what makes the relative silence of Our Origins refreshing.” – Chicago Reader

“Plenty of thought-provoking works on view.” – Time Out Chicago

“[Our Origins] reflects on natural history from a distinctly human point of view.” – The Beacon-News

“For all the wit, wisdom and insight here, Alison Ruttan steals the show… [While she] may not have revealed the mysteries of being; she has effectively portrayed us as too close to other primates for comfort, evoking a mixture of humor, absurdity, depression, truth and self-recognition.” – Newcity Art

In addition to the show, curator Allison Grant also gets a little love:

“It’s refreshing to see a curator take aim at the largest human questions, and it’s good for Grant’s first exhibition ever. I admire that ambition and hope Grant will continue probing those deep questions, since for as many artists as there are investigating consumerism and commodity culture, there are just as many examining the hard philosophical and scientific question” – Art Slant

Colleen Plumb and Kelli Connell to Sign Books at the MoCP

Whether taking pictures of humans or animals, both Colleen Plumb and Kelli Connell’s new photography books have a lot to say about how humans interact with other living things. And on Tuesday, Plumb and Connell will be interacting with people at the MoCP from 5 to 6:30pm to discuss their work and sign their new books.

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Colleen Plumb, Animals are Outside Today, Published by Radius Books

Plumb’s new book, Animals are Outside Today, explores the relationships humans form with animals. From beloved household pets to exotic circus animals, she explores the attachments people feel toward certain animals over others and how these emotions allow humans to grieve over the death of some animals but not others, such as road kill and animals slaughtered for meat.

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Kelli Connell, Double Life, Published by Decode Books

Connell’s new book, Double Life, scales back to examine the relationship between two identical individuals caught up in the complexity of everyday life. Seemingly benign scenarios, like having a picnic in the park, give way to more intimate interactions, like taking a bubble bath together. Magnifying the complexity of these emotions is the fact that these two women appear to be identical twins.

Colleen Plumb and Kelli Connell to Sign Books at the MoCP

Whether taking pictures of humans or animals, both Colleen Plumb and Kelli Connell’s new photography books have a lot to say about how humans interact with other living things. And on Tuesday, Plumb and Connell will be interacting with people at the MoCP from 5 to 6:30pm to discuss their work and sign their new books.

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Colleen Plumb, Animals are Outside Today, Published by Radius Books

Plumb’s new book, Animals are Outside Today, explores the relationships humans form with animals. From beloved household pets to exotic circus animals, she explores the attachments people feel toward certain animals over others and how these emotions allow humans to grieve over the death of some animals but not others, such as road kill and animals slaughtered for meat.

Connell_blog_9.22.jpg
Kelli Connell, Double Life, Published by Decode Books

Connell’s new book, Double Life, scales back to examine the relationship between two identical individuals caught up in the complexity of everyday life. Seemingly benign scenarios, like having a picnic in the park, give way to more intimate interactions, like taking a bubble bath together. Magnifying the complexity of these emotions is the fact that these two women appear to be identical twins.