Articles | Saturday 19 May 2012

Olivier writing here. This is my first post for Photojournalism Links. I’ve been a long-time follower of Mikko’s work, which has, over the years, proved to be an amazing resources for photojournalists and photo editors. It’s my pleasure to help Mikko update and develop the site further, and we’re already planning new things for the site. Stay tuned.

Let’s get started.

First things first, if you happen to be in London this coming week, head for the Frontline Club, which is holding a series of photography events, including VII Photo’s seminar (Hint: if you’re looking to buy the agency’s latest book Questions Without Answers, you’ll get the opportunity to get it signed by a lot of the their photographers!) Reportage by Getty Images will also be there with a couple of events, including a discussion with Peter Dench, Tom Stoddart and Aidan Sullivan. Finally, on 24 May, there’s the Panos Pictures Networking Party.

Washington Post: Vogue’s flattering article on Syria’s first lady is scrubbed from Web. The images used by Vogue were shot by James Nachtwey. A copy of the article is hosted by a website called President Assad here. In the Washington Post’s article, it’s mentioned that Assad’s children aren’t actually his but decoys planted for security reasons.

Examiner: The picture of dishonesty: social media slaps down a wedding photo faker.

Walk Your Camera: Perpetuating the Visual Myth of Appalachia – or how a photographer reacts to a very bad edit, done by CNN, of her work.

Martin Parr: Too Much Photography.

Photobooth at The New Yorker: Will Steacy’s Photographs Not Taken continues to make the rounds, this time with The New Yorker publishing Nina Berman’s story of Cathy, who she met in London in the 1990s.

Cover of “Photographs Not Taken”

PBS: Photojournalists Scramble to Video. Is it worth it? 

“Video storytelling is different in execution than still photography, without a doubt. But it has been well-established that very talented still photographers can make the transition back and forth between the media and enhance their visual reporting,” says Sean D. Elliot, president of the National Press Photographers Association.

A Photo Editor: Is it Time to Eliminate Stills From Your Shoot?

BJP: Lange-Taylor Prize Gets a Facelift, relaunches in 2013.

A lot of talk about Hipstamatic, Instagram, and all-things Lomography in recent weeks, especially since Facebook paid $1.2bn for Instagram, so here we go:

NYT Lens: Benjamin Lowy: Virtually Unfiltered. The article that brought back the whole Hipstamatic debate on the table.

Conscientious: On the Hipstamatic Journalist. Joerg Colberg wonders how The New York Times can publish Hipstamatic images without it violating its strict rules about photo manipulation.

NYT: Everyone’s Lives, in Instagram Pictures. Karen Rosenberg tries to answer the question: “Why do we want to tweak our pictures so conspicuously?”

NYT: Lomography, an Analog Company Surviving in a Digital World.

Time Lightbox: Lomography and the “Analogue Future”.

San Francisco Chronicle: Hipstamatic Founders Lucas Buick, Ryan Dorshorst. An interview with the founders of the controversial app, and their plans for the future, including the release of an iPad magazine with interviews of star photographers using Hipstamatic.

Slate: In Defense of Instagram: Why News Photography Goes Well With Vintage-Filtered Cat Pic. An older article (March 2012), but felt it was needed in this context.

PetaPixel: IKEA Cardboard Camera Called KNAPPA To Land on Store Shelves Soon. Even Ikea is going into the cheap digital camera market.

BJP: New app bring lossless “developed raw” images to the iPhone.

Even about Instagram and Hipstamatic. Last week, there was an auction to help the family of Anton Hammerl, who was killed in Libya a year ago.

BBC: War photographer Anton Hammerl remembered at auction. A video of the auction and interviews with family, friends and colleagues.

NYT Lens: At Christie’s, an Auction for Anton.

Time Lightbox: Robert Capa, Friend of Anton.

Talking about Robert Capa…

The Guardian: Robert Capa and Gerda Taro: love in a time of war.

In Spain, Capa soon developed a reputation for taking photographs whatever the risk, setting the tone for war reportage as we now know it. Taro, too, was often seen running across the battle lines with her camera, her bravery matched by her recklessness. She travelled back and forth to the frontlines, shooting what she saw, often driven by a mixture of humanity, political commitment and a shrewd understanding of the power of the photograph to shape public opinion.

Fred Stein Archive/Getty Images

Time Lightbox: Overseas Press Club Award Winners Announced. Including the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award, which went to André Liohn.

Channel 4 News: Death in a time of life. Jon Snow remembers Marie Colvin, who was killed in Syria earlier this year.

NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Horst Faas.

Photo by Horst Faas / AP Photo.

PDN: Horst Faas, AP Combat Photographer, Dies age 79.

Panos Pictures: Robin Hammond Released From Prison in Zimbabwe. After being held for two weeks in Zimbabwe, Robin Hammond has been released and is back in Paris, safe and sound. I’m looking forward to seeing the images he came back with after spending two years documenting this country.

NYT Lens: A Ride Cloaked in Secrecy. I love this kind of articles, giving us a behind-the-scenes look at the news, especially when it has a West Wing kind of vibe. Here, we get the background on how a photographer reported on President Obama’s secretive trip to Afghanistan.

The Guardian: What happens when a photojournalist travels to revisit his subjects?

NYT Lens: The Eddie Adams Workshop’s 25th Year.

NYT Lens: Touring the Nanny-Photographer’s Past. Yet another article about Vivian Maier.

Chicago Tribune: The Great John H. White.

Firecracker: Olivia Arthur. Chosen for her excellent Jeddah Diary, the photographer’s first book.

Photo by Olivia Arthur.

The Guardian: Richard Mosse’s best shot.

Photo by Richard Mosse / Institute.

The Guardian: Saatchi captures the confusion of contemporary photography.

“The title, Out of Focus, may have been meant ironically, but it takes on a more pointed meaning if you approach the show as a mirror of the fractured world of contemporary practice.”

Wall Street Journal: The Surreal Selling of Man Ray.

PhotoShelter: Photography Through the Eyes of Art Directors.

PhotoShelter: The 40+ Items Every Photography Assistants Needs Now.

A few articles about photographers’ rights and copyrights:

Time Lightbox: Fight for Your Right: Resources for Photographers Covering Protests (note: it’s mainly for US-based photographers).

Nancy L. Ford Blog: Why NOT to give away your copyrights.

BJP: More than $120,000,000 at stake in AFP v. Morel case.

The Russian Photos Blog: Agence France Presse vs Morel: “AFP Got Caught With A Hand In The Cookie Jar And Will Have To Pay” Out of 200 pages of legal documents filed by both Daniel Morel and Agence France-Presse / Getty Images, this sentence, written by an AFP employee is by far the one that caught the attention of the industry. I’ve used it in my standfirst as well, and A Photo Editor picked up as well.

BJP: Leica introduces a black-and-white digital M9 camera.

And to finish, a 100-minute documentary about Helmut Newton from Frames From The Edge. Of course, it’s best watched in full-screen.

And a 60-minute interview with Michele Hadlow, Forbes’ Senior Photo Editor on How to Shoot Powerful Portraits of Powerful People.

Finally, congratulations to photographers Karim Ben Khelifa and Finbarr O’Reilly. Both have been selected as International Nieman Fellows for the Class of 2013 at Harvard. Ben Khelifa will “conduct research on journalist-audience engagement, analyze the behavioral economics linked to crowdfunding and study new business models promoting the diversification of visual storytelling.” While O’Reilly will “study psychology to better understand how the human mind and behavior is affected by personal experience, with a focus on trauma and conflict zones.”