Meteorito “El Taco”

In 1962 a farmer in northern Argentina discovered a 2-ton meteor fragment in his field. A joint US-Argentine scientific team obtained the hunk of metal and proceeded to split the thing in two. Since then one half has sat at the entrance to Buenos Aires’ Planetarium while the other half has been in storage with the Smithsonian in Washington, DC.

Last year Argentine artists Guillermo Faivovich and Nicolas Goldberg reunited the two pieces at an exhibition in Germany. A catalog accompanying the exhibition was published by Hanje Catze. It contains photographs from the original scientific expedition, as well as photos by Faivovich and Goldberg of the two halves in their current states. It’s sort of like Evidence meets a Tale of Two Cities; one half sits in a pristine scientific warehouse in the 1st world while the other endures pigeon shit and the antics of school children on field trips to the Planetarium.

The two halves of "El Taco" reunited in Germany

El Taco

"El Taco" pre-split

Faivovich & Goldberg with the two pieces of "El Taco"

Here’s a link to an interview of the artists in Spanish.  Reuniting the two halves of El Taco took four years involving five agencies in two countries. The true work of art is the artists’ deft leaping through many bureaucratic hula-hoops in order to bring these two halves together.

The Argentine half of El Taco is now back at the Planetarium. Here’s a couple of pictures I took recently.

"El Taco" at the Planetarium in Buenos Aires

"El Taco" at the Planetarium in Buenos Aires